Lyndon B. Johnson: The Exercise of Power

By Rowland Evans; Robert Novak | Go to book overview

SOURCE NOTES
Our basic sources for information not contained in the public record were, first, our own experience as reporters in Washington; and second, more than two hundred special interviews with political figures and government officials who were either participants in or observers of the events described. The information derived from both our day-to-day reporting and from these special interviews was obtained on a confidential basis. Therefore, we cannot disclose the source of the original information contained in this book.The purpose of these notes is extremely limited. It is to attribute information not obtained by us from primary sources or contained in the public record but derived from secondary sources. Such sources were of only limited value in researching Johnson's Senate period and of even less value in our study of the presidential period.
CHAPTER II
Pp. 11-12: The Garner incident is from Michael C. Janeway, "Lyndon Johnson and the Rise of Conservatism in Texas" (Unpublished thesis. Harvard University, 1962).
Pp. 22-23: The origin and growth of Johnson's television interests is taken from articles by Louis M. Koblmeier in the Wall Street Journal of March 23 and 24, 1964.

CHAPTER IV
Pp. 56-57: The account of the Johnson-Humphrey conversation is based in part on Winthrop Griffith, Humphrey: A Candid Biography ( New York: William Morrow, 1965), pp. 213-214.

CHAPTER VI
P. 105: "a good deal more attractive'-- Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965), p. 11.
Pp. 116-117: The analysis of Johnson's stop-and-go tactics in 1959 is from Austin P. Sullivan, Jr., "Lyndon Johnson and the Senate Majority Leadership" (Unpublished thesis. Princeton University, 1964).

CHAPTER VII
P. 132: "in my purpose of protecting"-- Dwight D. Eisenhower, Waging Peace ( Garden City, N. Y.: Doubleday, 1965), p. 156.
P. 133 fn.: "a blow"--ibid., p. 158.

-575-

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Lyndon B. Johnson: The Exercise of Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Chapter I - The President 1
  • Chapter II - The Road to the Senate 5
  • Chapter III - Freshman Senator 26
  • Chapter IV - The Leader 50
  • Chapter V - Lbj's Balancing Act 71
  • Chapter VI - The Johnson System 88
  • Chapter VII - The Miracle of '57 119
  • Chapter VIII - The Legislator 141
  • Chapter IX - Lbj Vs. Ike 168
  • Chapter X - Too Many Democrats 195
  • Chapter XI - Love That Lyndon 225
  • Chapter XII - Comedy of Errors 243
  • Chapter XIII - Defeat-- and Emancipation 268
  • Chapter XIV - Campaigning for Kennedy 289
  • Chapter XV - The Vice- President 305
  • Chapter XVI - Let Us Continue 335
  • Chapter XVII - Taming the Congress 360
  • Chapter XVIII - Chief Diplomat 383
  • Chapter XIX - The Great Society 407
  • Chapter XX - Picking a Vice-President 435
  • Chapter XXI - In Search of a Record 464
  • Chapter XXII - Stockpiling Adversity 484
  • Chapter XXIII - The Dominican Intervention 510
  • Chapter XXIV - Vietnam 530
  • Chapter XXV - Adversity 557
  • Source Notes 575
  • Index 578
  • About the Authors 598
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