Britain and the United States in the Caribbean: A Comparative Study in Methods of Development

By Mary Proudfoot | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter I
INTRODUCTORY

1. THE WEST INDIES AS AN UNDERDEVELOPED AREA

This chapter is intended to provide a general background for the reader, before he enters more deeply into the comparative consideration of West Indian affairs. It may in the first place be desirable to set these small island dependencies in perspective against the wider background of total British and American commitments in underdeveloped areas. On the British side, the Colonial Empire consists of some forty- five different territories under thirty-five separate governors, who have responsibility for between sixty and seventy million persons. The tiny islands of the B.W.I. with less than three million persons thus constitute only a very small part of the total British commitment. On the American side the Caribbean dependencies, which like the British number about three million persons, are, in proportion, a larger part of the United States commitment. If Hawaii, Alaska and the South Pacific islands are included, the total American responsibility for dependent areas is still for less than four million persons. But American interests in underdeveloped areas are not, of course, limited to the small number of United States dependencies. Thus the Philippines are still, in a very real sense, an American commitment; and the study of American methods in independent states, as in Central America or Liberia where local economies are supported by dollars, has still to be made. These areas are apart altogether from America's Point Four programme for backward areas, which is a third kind of responsibility.

It should be realized that the Caribbean dependencies do not exhibit either of the metropolitan powers at their best. On the British side, the declared purpose of colonial policy today is that the economic and other resources of dependent areas for which the United Kingdom is responsible shall be developed to a point at which responsible government becomes practicable. It is, however, accepted as axiomatic that this point is not reached until a dependency has become virtually self-supporting in the economic sphere. The United Kingdom government has always

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Britain and the United States in the Caribbean: A Comparative Study in Methods of Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.