Slavery: History and Historians

By Peter J. Parish | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
For good brief discussions of health and ill-health among slaves, see Boles, Black Southerners, 94-104; Leslie H. Owens , This Species of Property: Slave Life and Culture in the Old South ( New York, 1976), 27-49; and, for one local example, Rosengarten, Tombee, 181-5, 187. The most authoritative study is Todd L. Savitt , Medicine and Slavery: The Diseases and Health Care of Blacks in Antebellum Virginia ( Urbana, Ill., 1978), but see also Kenneth F. Kiple and Virginia H. King , Another Dimension to the Black Diaspora: Diet, Disease and Racism ( Cambridge, 1981).
2.
Boles, Black Southerners, 88-94; Owens, This Species of Property, 50-69.
3.
Fogel and Engerman, Time on the Cross, volume I, 115-6; Sutch, "The Care and Feeding of Slaves", in David et al., eds., Reckoning with Slavery, 292-8. As with so many other topics, Fogel and Engerman opened up a new chapter in the debate on slave living conditions and standard of living by suggesting that they compared favorably with the diet, housing, and health of workers elsewhere. See Time on the Cross, volume I, 109-26. Their conclusions are called into question by Sutch, "The Care and Feeding of Slaves," 233-301.
4.
Joyner, Down by the Riverside, 119-20.
5.
Ibid., 90. Joyner provides valuable evidence from one locality about slave food, clothing, and housing. See 90-126.
6.
Elkins, Slavery, third ed., 81-139.
7.
A good cross section of critical responses to Elkins may be found in Ann J. Lane , ed., The Debate over Slavery: Stanley Elkins and His Critics ( Urbana, Ill., 1971).
8.
John W. Blassingame, The Slave Community: Plantation Life in the Antebellum South, revised and enlarged edition ( New York, 1979), 331 and more generally 323-31. (All subsequent references to The Slave Community are to the revised and enlarged edition.)
11.
Ibid., 223-6, 238, 248. For examples of Blassingame's critics, see George P. Rawick , "Some Notes on a Social Analysis of Slavery: A Critique and Assessment of The Slave Community", in Al-Tony Gilmore , ed., Revisiting Blassingame's "The Slave Community:" The Scholars Respond ( Westport, Ct., 1978), 19-20, 34-5; Leslie H. Owens , "Blacks in the Slave Community," ibid., 65-8.
12.
Blassingame, The Slave Community, 305. On 322, Blassingame amplifies his description of the typical slave as "hostilely submissive and occasionally obstinate, ungovernable and rebellious."
13.
Fogel and Engerman, Time on the Cross, volume I, 148-52, 238-42.
14.
Lane, ed., The Debate over Slavery, 350. See also the essays by Roy S. Bryce- Laporte and by George M. Fredrickson and Christopher Lasch, ibid., 269-92 and 223-44.
15.
Herbert Aptheker, American Negro Slave Revolts ( New York, 1943).
16.
Stephen B. Oates, The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion ( New York, 1975) is a good account of the most notable slave uprising in the antebellum decades.
17.
Charles B. Dew, "Black Ironworkers and the Slave Insurrection Panic of 1856", Journal of Southern History 41 ( 1975): 321-38.
18.
C. Vann Woodward, "John Brown's Private War" in The Burden of Southern History ( Baton Rouge, La., 1960), 61-8; Steven A. Channing, Crisis of Fear: Secession in South Carolina ( New York, 1970) especially 18-30, 47-57, 83- 101.
19.
Two influential essays by leading historians dealing with the slave personality and slave resistance are: Kenneth M. Stampp , "Rebels and Sambos: The Search for the Negro's Personality in Slavery", Journal of Southern History 37 ( 1971): 367-92, reprinted in Stampp, The Imperiled Union: Essays on the Background of the Civil War

-93-

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Slavery: History and Historians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Paradoxical Institution: 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Making of an Institution 11
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - The Labor of the Slaves 26
  • Notes 41
  • 4 - The Business of Slavery 43
  • Notes 61
  • 5 - The Lives of the Slaves 64
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - Variations, Exceptions, and Comparisons 97
  • Notes 121
  • 7 - Slavery and Southern White Society 124
  • Notes 146
  • 8 - The Death Throes of Slavery 149
  • Notes 165
  • Bibliographic Essay 167
  • Index 189
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