Slavery: History and Historians

By Peter J. Parish | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
William Henry Trescot, quoted in Rosengarten, Tombee, 139.
2.
See for example Edward Pessen, "How Different from Each Other Were the Antebellum North and South?" American Historical Review 85 ( 1980): 1119-49.
3.
I have explored this theme somewhat further in a hitherto unpublished paper on "Southern Nationalism and American Nationalism."
4.
The early champion of the yeoman-democracy thesis was Frank L. Owsley ; see his Plain Folk of the Old South ( Baton Rouge, La., 1949). Randolph B. Campbell , "Planters and Plain Folks: The Social Structure of the Antebellum South", in John B. Boles and Evelyn T. Nolen , eds., Interpreting Southern History: Historiographical Essays in Honor of Sanford W. Higginbotham ( Baton Rouge, La., 1987), 48-77, provides an excellent review of the literature on the subject.
5.
The evolution of Genovese views may be traced through many of his writings, including The Political Economy of Slavery; In Red and Black; The World the Slaveholders Made; and in numerous essays.
6.
George M. Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817-1914 ( New York, 1971), 61-8, 93- 6. Fredrickson attributes the term "herrenvolk democracy" to Pierre L. van den Berghe , Race and Racism: A Comparative Perspective ( New York, 1967).
7.
Oakes, The Ruling Race, especially chapter 2.
8.
Forrest McDonald and Grady McWhiney , "The Antebellum Southern Herdsman: A Reinterpretation", Journal of Southern History 41 ( 1975): 147-66.
9.
Steven A. Channing, Crisis of Fear: Secession in South Carolina ( New York, 1970); William L. Barney, The Road to Secession: A New Perspective on the Old South ( New York, 1972); Michael P. Johnson , Toward a Patriarchal Republic: The Secession of Georgia ( Baton Rouge, La., 1977); J. Mills Thornton, Politics and Power in a Slave Society: Alabama, 1800- 1860 ( Baton Rouge, La., 1978); Kenneth S. Greenberg , Masters and Statesmen: The Political Culture of American Slavery ( Baltimore, 1985); Laurence Shore, Southern Capitalists: The Ideological Leadership of an Elite, 1832-1885 ( Chapel Hill, N.C., 1986); Bruce Collins, White Society in the Antebellum South ( London, 1985). Collins, in particular, provides a valuable synthesis of recent work, spiced by his own personal reflections.
10.
Steven Hahn, The Roots of Southern Populism: Yeoman Farmers and the Transformation of the Georgia Up-Country, 1850-1890 ( New York, 1983); Harris, Plain Folk and Gentry in a Slave Society; Randolph B. Campbell, A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880 ( Austin, Tx., 1983); Randolph B. Campbell and Richard G. Lowe, Wealth and Power in Antebellum Texas (College Station, Tx., 1977). See also some of the essays in Orville V. Burton and Robert C. McMath , eds., Class, Conflict and Consensus: Antebellum Southern Community Studies ( Westport, Ct., 1982).
11.
Randolph B. Campbell, "Planters and Plain Folks: The Social Structure of the Antebellum South", in Boles and Nolen, eds., Interpreting Southern History, 65. See also Campbell, A Southern Community in Crisis.
12.
Olsen, "Historians and the Extent of Slaveownership in the Southern United States," 116.
13.
See Collins, White Society in the Antebellum South, 83-97, for a helpful discussion of the mobility and fluidity of Southern society.
15.
Steven Hahn, "The Yeomanry of the Nonplantation South: Upper Piedmont Georgia, 1850-1860" in Burton and McMath, eds., Class, Conflict and Consensus, 29-56.

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