Slavery: History and Historians

By Peter J. Parish | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
For one recent example see Harris, Plain Folk and Gentry in a Slave Society, 190-1.
2.
See above, 60-61.
3.
For a spirited account of the mounting anxieties of slaveholders on the eve of secession and Civil War, see Oakes, The Ruling Race, 227-42.
4.
Channing, Crisis of Fear, provides a vivid account of this process in South Carolina. (Cf. chapter 5, note 18.) For Georgia, there is an equally good account in Clarence L. Mohr, On the Threshold of Freedom: Masters and Slaves in Civil War Georgia ( Athens, Ga., 1986), 3-50.
5.
Mohr, On the Threshold of Freedom, xv. The discussion in the following paragraphs of slavery within the Confederacy relies heavily on Mohr's excellent study of Georgia. See also James H. Brewer, The Confederate Negro: Virginia's Craftsmen and Military Laborers, 1861-1865 ( Durham, N.C., 1969). There is still a great deal of useful information to be found in the much older study by Bell I. Wiley , Southern Negroes, 1861-1865 ( New Haven, 1938).
6.
Frank L. Owsley, State Rights in the Confederacy ( Chicago, 1925), 264-5.
7.
Harris, Plain Folk and Gentry in a Slave Society, 167-70. The Linton Stephens quotation appears on page 167.
8.
Mohr, On the Threshold of Freedom, 118; C. Peter Ripley, Slaves and Freedmen in Civil War Louisiana ( Baton Rouge, La., 1976), 13.
9.
Robert F. Durden, The Gray and the Black: The Confederate Debate on Emancipation ( Baton Rouge, La., 1972), 184.
10.
There is a classic study of the situation in the South Carolina sea islands by Willie Lee Rose, Rehearsal for Reconstruction: The Port Royal Experiment ( Indianapolis, 1964); Louisiana is well covered in Ripley, Slaves and Freedmen.
11.
Fields, Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground, 90-130.
12.
On the policy of the federal government and its implementation, see La- Wanda Cox , Lincoln and Black Freedom: A Study in Presidential Leadership ( Columbia, S.C., 1981), and Louis S. Gerteis, From Contraband to Freedman: Federal Policy Toward Southern Blacks, 1861- 1865 ( Westport, Ct., 1973).
13.
The description of first responses to liberation in this and following paragraphs relies heavily on Leon F. Litwack, Been in the Storm So Long: The Aftermath of Slavery ( New York, 1979). Litwack provided a briefer statement of some of the main themes of his major study in his "Free at Last," in Tamara K. Hareven, ed., Anonymous Americans: Explorations in Nineteenth-Century Social History ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1971), 131-71.
14.
Ripley, Slaves and Freedmen, 58, and, more generally, 37-9, 43-68.
15.
Gerteis, From Contraband to Freedman; Lawrence N. Powell, New Masters: Northern Planters During the Civil War and Reconstruction ( New Haven, 1980).
16.
Ripley, Slaves and Freedmen, 42.
17.
Litwack, Been in the Storm So Long, 64-103. The standard work on black soldiers in the Union army is Dudley T. Cornish , The Sable Arm: Negro Troops in the Union Army, 1861-1865 ( New York, 1966).
18.
Rose, Slavery and Freedom, 94.
19.
Ibid., 110-111. There is no more sensitive or perceptive brief account of the immediate impact of emancipation upon slaves and their owners than in two of the essays in Slavery and Freedom: " Masters without Slaves," 73-89, and " Blacks without Masters: Protagonists and Issue," 90-111. Eugene Genovese and Herbert Gutman are two other major historians of slavery who have made very effective use of evidence drawn from the time of emancipation.
20.
Litwack, Been in the Storm So Long, 162.
22.
Rose, Slavery and Freedom,94.

-165-

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Slavery: History and Historians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Paradoxical Institution: 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Making of an Institution 11
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - The Labor of the Slaves 26
  • Notes 41
  • 4 - The Business of Slavery 43
  • Notes 61
  • 5 - The Lives of the Slaves 64
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - Variations, Exceptions, and Comparisons 97
  • Notes 121
  • 7 - Slavery and Southern White Society 124
  • Notes 146
  • 8 - The Death Throes of Slavery 149
  • Notes 165
  • Bibliographic Essay 167
  • Index 189
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