A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1

By Timothy Pitkin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.

Charters of Connecticut and Rhode Island obtained at a favorable moment--Measures taken to resume the Charters--Difference between the crown and the colonists on this subject--Declaration of Massachusetts concerning charter rights in 1661-- Royal commissioners sent to regulate the New England colonies--Their reception--Massachusetts refuse to submit to their authority and send a petition to the king--Complaints against Massachusetts--Committee of trade require an answer to these complaints--Answer not satisfactory--Massachusetts refuse to submit to the wishes of the king--Writs of quo warranto issue against the charter of that colony--Judgment against it--Writs issue against those of Connecticut and Rhode Island--Their letters considered a surrender of them--Sir Edmund Andrus appointed governor general of New England--His despotic acts--Revolution in New England--Connecticut and Rhode Island resume their Charters--New Charter granted Massachusetts--Great Britain jealous of the independence of the colonies-- brought into parliament to resume the Charter governments--Defeated--King appeals from the colonial courts in civil suits--Explanatory Charter of Massachusetts--Law of descents in Connecticut declared void--Massachusetts refuse to provide a permanent salary for the governor--Present an address to the king on the subject--Heard before the board of trade--Conduct of that colony condemned-- Jealousy of its growing power increases.

CONTROVERSIES soon arose between the parent country and the colonists, under the charter governments. These disputes, as we have before stated, commenced in Massachusetts, as early as 1635, nor did they end, till the American revolution.

The charters of Connecticut and Rhode Island, were obtained at a favorable moment. Just called to the government of his kingdom, Charles was not disposed to deny favors to any of his subjects. In addition to this, Lords Say and Seal, and the Earl of Manchester, both the friends of New England, were then in favor with the king.

Mr. Winthrop, the agent of Connecticut, a gentleman of talents and address, was in possession of a ring given to his grandfather, by the father of Charles II, which he presented to that monarch. This secured him a most gracious reception at court.*

____________________
*
Trumbull's History of Connecticut, vol. 1.

-107-

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A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Note 8
  • Contents 9
  • Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 85
  • Chapter IV 107
  • Chapter V 132
  • Chapter VI 155
  • Chapter VII 213
  • Chapter VIII 282
  • Chapter IX 328
  • Chapter X 384
  • Appendix--Notes 423
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