A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1

By Timothy Pitkin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.

Repeal of Stamp Act, a joyful event in America--Ministry seem well disposed to-
wards the Colonists--Compensation to those, who suffered by disturbances in con-
sequence of the Stamp Act, required--Massachusetts delays granting the compen-
sation--New York refuses to furnish all the articles required by the Mutiny Act--This
offends the Ministry--New Administration--Duties imposed on glass and other ar-
ticles in the Colonies--Board of Custom House Officers established in America--
Legislature of New York prohibited from passing laws, until a compliance with the
Mutiny Act--Massachusetts among the first to oppose the new duties--Circular
letter of the House of Representatives of that Province--Disapproved by the Minis-
try--The House directed to rescind its vote--Other Colonies required to disregard
the Circular of Massachusetts--The House refuses to rescind--Other Colonies unite
with Massachusetts--Spirited conduct of New York and Maryland--Disturbances at
Boston--Troops sent there--Convention of the people in Massachusetts--Troops
quartered in Boston--Conduct of Massachusetts censured by Parliament--King au-
thorized to bring offenders in the Colonies to Great Britain for trial--Proceedings of
Virginia--Disputes in Massachusetts in relation to the troops--The new duties re-
pealed, except the duty on Tea--This is not satisfactory to the Colonists--Royal pro-
vision for Governor's salary in Massachusetts--Declared a dangerous innovation--
Destruction of the Gaspee in Rhode Island--Disputes between Governor Hutchin-
son and the Assembly of Massachusetts concerning the supremacy of Parliament--
Committees of correspondence between the Colonies appointed--Private Letters of
Governor Hutchinson published--Occasion a petition for his removal--East India
Company send tea to America--Destroyed at Boston--Boston port bill--Alteration
of Massachusetts Charter--These acts resisted in the Colonies.

The news of the repeal of the stamp act, was received with unbounded joy, in America. The house of representatives in Massachusetts, passed a vote expressing their gratitude to the king, for assenting to the repeal, and giving their thanks to Mr. Pitt, the Duke of Grafton, and many others, for their generous efforts in favor of the colonies. In Virginia, a bill passed the house of burgesses, for erecting a statue to the king, and an obelisk, to commemorate those in England, who had distinguished themselves, in favor of American rights.

The colonists seemed only to view their release from present evil; without much regard to the extensive, and inadmissible principles of the declaratory act. They considered this act as a

-213-

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A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Note 8
  • Contents 9
  • Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 85
  • Chapter IV 107
  • Chapter V 132
  • Chapter VI 155
  • Chapter VII 213
  • Chapter VIII 282
  • Chapter IX 328
  • Chapter X 384
  • Appendix--Notes 423
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