A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1

By Timothy Pitkin | Go to book overview

ALPPENDIX--NOTES.
NO. 1.

Articles of confederation between the plantations under the government of the Massachusetts, New Plymouth, Connecticut, New Haven, in New England, with the plantations in combination with them

Whereas, we all came into these parts of America with one and the same end and aim, namely, to advance the kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to enjoy the liberties of the gospel in purity with peace; and whereas in our settling, (by the wise providence of God,) we are further dispersed from the sea coast and rivers, than was at the first intended, so that we cannot according to our desire, with convenience communicate in one government and jurisdiction; and whereas, we live encompassed with people of several nations and strange languages, which hereafter may prove injurious to us and our posterity; and forasmuch as the natives have committed sundry insolences and outrages upon several plantations of the English, and have of late combined themselves against us, and seeing, by reason of the sad distractions in England, (which they have heard of, or by which they know,) we are hindered, both from the humble way of seeking advice, and reaping those comfortable fruits of protection, which at other times we might well expect; we therefore do conceive it our bounden duty, without delay, to enter into a present consociation amongst ourselves, for mutual help and strength in all future concernments; that as in nation and relation, so in other respects we be, and continue one, according to the tenor and true meaning of the ensuing articles.

1. Wherefore, it is fully agreed and concluded, between the parties and jurisdictions above named, and they jointly and severally do by these presents agree, and conclude that they all be, and henceforth be called by the name of the United Colonies of New England.
2. The said United Colonies, for themselves and their posterities, do jointly and severally, hereby enter into a firm and perpetual league of friendship and amity, for offense and defense, mutual advice and succor, upon all just occasions, both for preserving and propagating

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