Depression, Recovery and Higher Education: A Report by Committee Y of the American Association of University Professors. The Draft of This Report Was Prepared by Malcolm M. Willey

By Malcolm M. Willey; American Association of University Professors | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
FACULTY SIZE DURING THE DEPRESSION

EFFICIENT work in the teaching profession at the higher level I depends upon more than an adequate wage, important as this undoubtedly is. Members of college faculties want not only a position and the salary that goes with it, but also the security of tenure that provides favorable conditions for continued work and the feeling of certainty that if the work is well done it will receive full recognition, principally through promotion and such increase in salary as normally accompanies it. A high level of faculty morale is dependent upon the existence of these factors. Discouragement and inefficiency will inevitably develop from inadequacy of salary, uncertainty of employment or no employment at all, and the blocking of the normal expectations for professional advancement. This is a simple and obvious truism, but an important one.

It is therefore desirable to inquire concerning the influence of the economic crisis upon the status of the profession during the years since 1930-1931. How have the depression circumstances influenced employment, salary, promotion, and appointment? How have the members of the profession fared as individuals? What adjustments in their lives have they been called upon to make? What are the facts with respect to such matters and what changes in policy are associated with them? It is such questions as these that are considered in the next six chapters. The answers to them may perhaps serve as the basis of judgment concerning the status of the profession at institutions of higher education during the depression period.

Source of the Data. Answers should involve facts and not impressions. Ideally it would be desirable to have these facts from each institution of higher education in the country. The inadequacies of the statistical materials pertaining to higher education are called to attention in the Appendix of this report and need not be reviewed here. No agency now collects for the entire United States the type of information essential for a detailed analysis of the topics with which this section deals. Nor are the resources of the American Association of University Professors sufficient to permit any committee representing it to attempt collection of data from all the colleges, universities, pro

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