Education in Arab Countries of the Near East: Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon

By Roderic D. Matthews; Matta Akrawi | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
AL-AZHAR AND ITS INSTITUTIONS OF MUHAMMADAN LEARNING

THE VENERABLE MOSQUE of al-Azhar is the oldest existing Muslim university in the world. It was founded by the Fatimids soon after their conquest of Egypt. Its foundation stone was laid in 359 A.H. (970 A.D.), and it was opened for services in 361 A.H. (972 A.D.).1 From being an important center of instruction in Muslim law and religion and the Arabic language, al-Azhar, with the passage of centuries, has become the unrivaled institution of Islamic learning, receiving students from all parts of the Muslim world.

Al-Azhar now includes three higher Faculties (Arabic, Theology, and Muslim Law) and nine institutes, seven of which consist of primary and secondary sections, and two, of primary sections only. These institutes are located in Cairo, Alexandria, Tanta, Zaqaziq, Shabin al-Kom, Asyut, Dassuq, Damietta, and Qina. In addition, a traditional "general section," which accepts unclassified students, is still maintained. Altogether al-Azhar in 1945-46 had an enrollment of 14,402 students, distributed as follows:

DivisionEnrollment
Primary sections5,729
Secondary sections4,678
General section1,422
Higher Faculties
Faculty of Arabic1,162
Faculty of Muslim Law873
Faculty of Theology5382,573
Total14,402

In that year there were 814 foreign students from more than thirty countries, including Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Transjordan, North Africa ( Tripoli, Tunisia, Algeria, and Spanish and French Morocco), Hijaz, Yaman, Sudan and Darfur, Turkey, Kurdistan, Turkestan, Iraq,

____________________
1
"Al-Azhar," Encyclopedia of Islam (Leyden: 1913), I, 532-39.

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Education in Arab Countries of the Near East: Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.