Hard at Work in Factories and Mines: The Economics of Child Labor during the British Industrial Revolution

By Carolyn Tuttle | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I should like to express my heartfelt thanks to Joel Mokyr for his steadfast support of my research on child labor and for inspiring me to become a leaned economic historian. I would like to thank Avner Offer for sponsoring me at Nuffield College in Oxford during my sabbatical and Maxine Berg for connecting me with resources and other scholars in Great Britain who could help me with my research. I am grateful for the time Helen Buchanan, a librarian at Radcliffe Camera, devoted to helping me find many of the primary sources I used for this research I would also like to thank the participants of the Economic History Workshops at All Souls College of Oxford University, Warwick University, Nuffield College and University of Chicago for offering suggestions to strengthen my argument. Many thanks also go to Jeffrey Williamson and Lou Cain for reading and commenting on an earlier draft of this book. I feel very fortunate to have such wonderful and supportive colleagues at Lake Forest College and I would like to especially thank Simone Wegge, Diana Darnell and Kathryn Dohrmann for sharing their wisdom on several pertinent issues which needed to be addressed. My research assistant, Nicole Polarek, was extremely helpful in locating important sources and in proofreading early drafts. I am especially grateful to Kathleen Weber for giving me the support and encouragement to complete this project. I am also deeply indebted to Harriet Doud, upon whose dedication and resourcefulness I have relied throughout the editing and formatting of this book. At Westview, I had pleasure of working with Rob Williams whose high editorial standards helped to improve the finished product. In addition, the thoughtful comments of an anonymous referee have helped to sharpen the main argument of this book.

Carolyn Tuttle

-xi-

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