Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Group

By Denise E. Wilfley; K. Roy Mackenzie et al. | Go to book overview

Having provided the background of IPT and the relevant issues in adapting IPT for group, we can continue with our discussion of how to administer IPT-G. First, however, it should be noted that the majority of clinical case material presented in this book has been derived from the NIMH comparative psychotherapy study for binge eating disorder (the only empirical study of IPT-G to date) ( Wilfley, 1999) and, therefore, much of this case material references the clinical and diagnostic features of BED. Nevertheless, given the comorbidity associated with BED (e.g., major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, Axis II personality disorders), all of the case material presented will be relevant for clinicians and researchers who wish to use IPT-G with other diagnostic groups.


NOTES
1.
Harry Stack Sullivan, The Interpersonal Theory of Psychiatry ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1953), p.13.
2.
The authors are indebted to Mary Ann Frank, Ph.D., Emily Spurrell, Ph.D., and Bruce Rounsaville, M.D., for their involvement in formulating the specific adaptations outlined in this last section.
3.
In the Wilfley et al., 1999 large-scale (n=162) NIMH-funded comparative psychotherapy study for binge eating disorder (BED), IPT-G rivaled the effect of CBT in the short and long term across multiple domains. The effect sizes for both CBT and IPT are comparable to the best outcomes found with individual treatment.

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