Dictionary of Abstract Painting: With a History of Abstract Painting

By Michel Seuphor | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Although a great deal has been written about abstract painting, there is no one work available which gives a comprehensive historical survey of the subject for all countries in which this new development has manifested itself. The study published by Michel Seuphor some years ago was confined in its historical scope to the first ten years of abstract art and hence gives little indication as to what happened after 1920.

The present work does not pretend to list the name of every abstract painter -- obviously an impossible task -- nor to make a final critical selection. It will however, we venture to think, provide the general public, students of art and artists themselves with a source of information which has been lacking up to the present time.

This book may be used in three ways: it may be read as a historical work, it may be perused from time to time as an album, or it may be kept at hand as a reference work full of accurate and ample information.

The illustrations have been chosen so as to give the widest possible view of the subject, although this concern has not been allowed to take precedence over such important considerations as the quality of the work illustrated or the proven value of the artist.

The chronological chart given on pages 106 to 113 provides an ever-present guide to the reader who wishes to place a particular development in its historical context as he reads, or to take in at a glance the whole history of abstract art from 1910 to 1956.

THE PUBLISHER

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of Abstract Painting: With a History of Abstract Painting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword *
  • Contents *
  • Part I - History of Abstract Painting *
  • Notes 85
  • Appendices 89
  • Chronological Table of Abstract Art 105
  • Part II - Dictionary of Abstract Painting 115
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 305

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.