The Treason of the Senate

By David Graham Phillips | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
Left Arm of the Monster
WE have now seen,
First: That there has been in the past quarter of a century an amazing and unnatural uppiling of wealth in the hands of a few; that there has been an equally amazing and equally unnatural descent of the masses, despite skill and industry and the boundless resources of the country, toward the dependence of wages and salaries; that the massing of wealth and the diffusion of dependence are both swiftly increasing.
Second: That these abnormal conditions have come with, and out of, the development of a small group of controllers of railways and, through them, of finance and manufactures; that this little group controls and freely levies upon and trims the twenty thousand millions of our annual internal commerce, three-fourths of which is interstate and therefore subject to the supervision of Congress only.
Third: That this little group owes its power and its wealth, in part to legislation favoring it, but in the main to the failure of Congress to safeguard the people in the possession of the fruits of their labor by enacting the laws in regulation of interstate commerce which the public welfare has clearly demanded and which the Constitution clearly authorizes.
Fourth: That the responsibility both for

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