The Treason of the Senate

By David Graham Phillips | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
Thrifty Patriot Allison

IN Allison of Iowa the Republican-Democratic "merger" for betraying the people to "the interests" has about its craftiest senatorial agent. If he were a man of courage and decision, and if he "represented" a Rhode Island whose senators could flout its public opinion, not Aldrich but Allison would be the leader of the "merger." His skill at duplicity needs no other tribute than the fact that, despite an unbroken record of forty-three years of betrayal of the people to "the interests," especially the people of his own state, he has been a senator continuously for thirty- three years. How politically careless have we been, how short-memoried, how credulous of words and neglectful of deeds, how easily tricked by cunning appeals to prejudice! We have been struggling with the great thieves operating through railways and tariffs, and have not seen that it was the Senate that determined our national laws, superintended the distribution of our prosperity, and selected our national judges. We have been defeated because we have not realized that it was our Allisons and Aldriches and Lodges and Baileys in far- away Washington, in the Senate, who were making our struggles futile--were making, and are.

Allison's public beginnings were in 1863, when he, a poor Dubuque lawyer of thirty- four, was sent to the House because about all the best young men of that then sparsely populated state were at the war. He found Congress, which the people thought absorbed in patriotic labor, really possessed by and busy for the great graft-seekers through war contracts and Union Pacific and other Western enterprises in vast land and franchise looting. Like him who journeyed from Dan to Beersheba, young Allison had fallen among thieves. But they did not despoil and despitefully use him; they made friends with him. Like latter-day Joe Bailey, he was poor; but, unlike Joe, he did not have to wait until he was a senator before he suddenly struck "pay-dirt" in quantity. To go into that part of his career in detail would be to retell the stupendous graft story of the Union Pacific Credit Mobilier, etc.; Allison was more or less active in and for all of those huge "loans" and land grabs which cost the people and netted "the interests" thousands of millions, besides licenses in perpetuity to extort rents and exorbitant freight rates. He was hand in glove with the chief "developers of the resources of the country"--with John I. Blair, Morris K. Jesup, Jim Fisk, L. B. Crocker, Oakes Ames, and the rest.

One typical instance: It came out in 1873 that our poor young patriot had been for some time owner of at least sixty thousand dollars of Dubuque and Sioux City stock; that he got it soon after his début at Washington, along about 1867, when with his aid the road got the valuable favor of a Congressional act saving it from the just forfeiture of its charter (act of March 2, 1867). Before the Congressional ( Wilson) investigation committee, compelled by the public scandal over the many vast and open robberies with Congressional aid, they asked Allison on February 1, 1873,

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Treason of the Senate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 100

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.