The Critical Period of American History, 1783-1789

By John Fiske | Go to book overview

NOTES ON THE ILLUSTRATIONS.
All the maps, except where otherwise specified, have been made from my drawings or under my direction.The abbreviation (Emmet: Lenox) signifies that the illustration is taken from the collection of Dr. Thomas Addis Emmet, which is now in the Lenox Library, New York.
JAMES MADISON (photogravure) Frontispiece

From the original painting by Gilbert Stuart, at Bowdoin College. Autograph from Lenox Library, New York.

GUY VAUX: OVERTHROW OF LORD NORTH'S MINISTRY3

From Caricatures of James Gillray, Political Series, vol. i., one of the books of my old friend, the late Samuel Jones Tilden, now in Lenox Library.

In the foreground the jackass, George III., sits dozing, crowned with a dunce-cap, while above him hangs the riband of the Garter, containing a crown borne on a donkey's back. The sceptre is in a bag lying on the floor, and under the throne is a keg marked Gunpowder. Charles Fox as Guy Fawkes (= Vaux = Fox), with vulpine face, is coming through the door, lantern in hand, while on his right the Duke of Richmond carries a fagot of sticks, and on his left the Earl of Shelburne brings in another keg of powder. Between Shelburne and Fox we see the face of Dunning, afterward Lord Ashburton; while behind Dunning appears Edmund Burke in spectacles. The wall of the anteroom is decorated with a figure of Catiline.

EARL OF SHELBURNE5

From a mezzotint in the Letters of Junius, London, 1801. Autograph from Correspondence of the Earl of Chatham, vol. iii.

CHARLES JAMES FOX7

From National Portraits, vol. v., after an original painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds, in the possession of Lord Denman. Autograph from MS. collection in Library of Boston Athenæum.

THOMAS GRENVILLE11

From National Portraits, vol. vi., after an original painting by John Hopner, in the possession of Hon. G. M. Fortescue. Autograph from the same book.

RODNEY TRIUMPHANT13

From the Gillray Caricatures, Lenox Library.

I have never seen any description of this very interesting satirical print. Wright, in his learned work on the caricature history of the House of Han

-xxi-

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The Critical Period of American History, 1783-1789
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Preface to the First Edition viii
  • Contents xi
  • Notes on the Illustrations. xxi
  • Chapter I Results of Yorktown 1
  • Chapter II - The Thirteen Commonwealths 50
  • Chapter III - The League of Friendship 92
  • Chapter IV - Drifting Toward Anarchy 139
  • Chapter V - Germs of National Sovereignty 203
  • Chapter VI - The Federal Convention 249
  • Chapter VII - Crowning the Work 327
  • Bibliographical Note 377
  • Members of the Federal Convention 383
  • Presidents of the Continental Congress 386
  • Index 387
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