The Big Five: Arms Control Decision-Making in the Soviet Union

By Aleksandr' G. Savel'Yev; Nikolay N. Detinov et al. | Go to book overview

10
Medium-Range Nuclear Weapons Negotiations: Was the "Zero Option" Really So Bad?

On March 12, 1985, the Nuclear and Space Talks (NST) began in Geneva. One portion of these talks involved negotiations on Medium-Range Nuclear Weapons (MRNW), or intermediate- range nuclear forces (INF) in U.S. terminology). The directives developed by the Five for these negotiations reflected many aspects of the main tasks put forward by the Soviet leadership during the earlier negotiations in 1982 and 1983. In fact, the primary goals remained unchanged: first, to make the United States halt the deployment of new missiles, and, second, to force withdrawal of these weapons from Europe. In return, the Soviet Union would be prepared cease fielding new SS-20/RSD-10s and, later, to "back off" all its "measures of response."

At the same time, the Soviet aim was to achieve an agreement on the reductions of the Soviet and NATO MRNW in Europe to agreed levels; in other words British and French nuclear forces would be taken into general account. This proposal was preconditioned on the complete withdrawal of all American Pershing II ballistic missiles and GLCM from Europe. From its part, the Soviet Union was prepared to reduce the total of its medium-range ballistic missiles (MRBM) in the European zone to a number equal--by warheads--to those of the United States, the United Kingdom, and France, combined. The Soviet

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The Big Five: Arms Control Decision-Making in the Soviet Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1- The Historical Background 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2- The Politburo Commission For The Supervision of The Negotiations 15
  • Notes 30
  • 3- The Big Five and The Small Five 31
  • Note 42
  • 4 - The Salt II Talks: The Decision-Making Mechanism in Action 43
  • Notes 53
  • 5- "Euromissiles" and The Principle of Equal Security 55
  • Notes 68
  • 6- The Start Negotiations And the Final Period Of Superpower Confrontation 71
  • Notes 80
  • 7- The Return to The Negotiations: the Prelude To Perestroyka 83
  • Notes 94
  • 8- The Krasnoyarsk Affair 95
  • Notes 109
  • 9- Perestroyka and the Further Refinement of The Decision-Making Mechanism 111
  • Note 122
  • 10- Medium-Range Nuclear Weapons Negotiations: Was the "Zero Option" Really So Bad? 123
  • Notes 139
  • 11- The Start Treaty: Who Made Concessions to Whom? 141
  • Note 150
  • 12- The Difficult Path to The Start Treaty 151
  • 13- Defense and Space Issues: A Field for Future Negotiations? 163
  • Notes 182
  • 14- The Big Five: from Its Birth To Its Death 183
  • Note 192
  • 15- Reflections 193
  • Index 195
  • About the Authors and Editor 205
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