War and American Women: Heroism, Deeds, and Controversy

By William B. Breuer | Go to book overview

26 ❖ Trials and Tribulations

On the night of October 4, 1993, the Kennedy Center in Washington was packed with Navy brass and their exquisitely gowned wives for a concert honoring the sea service's 218th birthday.1 Seated in the box of honor were the new secretary of the Navy, John H. Dalton, and the chief of naval operations, Admiral Frank Kelso. Although all seemed serene in the box, undercurrents of electricity wafted through the air. Only days earlier, Dalton had recommended that Kelso be fired for his alleged failure to halt excesses at the 1991 Tailhook convention in Las Vegas.

Kelso, a submariner by trade, was to complete his four-year tour in July after more than thirty years of exemplary service.

Dalton, a Clinton appointee, was known throughout the Navy as the "Quota-meister" after his plan to commission new officers "in a percentage approximately equal to the racial makeup of the American populace" became known. "That translates to about twelve percent African-Americans, twelve percent Hispanics, and five percent Asian Americans," Dalton had pointed out.

A graduate of the Naval Academy in 1964, Dalton resigned from active duty after five years and went into private business. Like his friend Bill Clinton, he had been a finalist in the Rhodes Scholar competition.

Dalton's plan to scuttle sixty-year-old Frank Kelso was botched from the beginning. The Navy secretary had made his decision known privately after reviewing the cases of thirty-four admirals and one Marine Corps general who had attended the 1991 Tailhook convention. But someone in the Pentagon leaked the proposed move to the media over the weekend before the affair at the Kennedy Center. So Admiral Kelso learned of his fate in the press.

Service secretaries are generally seen but not heard in the Pentagon's major policy debates. Each serves as a budget custodian, promoter, and master of ceremonies for his respective military branch. Firing a member of the Joint Chiefs is the prerogative of the secretary of defense and the President, not the service secretary. Two years earlier, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney decided that Admiral Kelso should not be dropped over the side as a Tailhook casualty.

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War and American Women: Heroism, Deeds, and Controversy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.