The Arts and Human Development: A Psychological Study of the Artistic Process

By Howard Gardner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Many individuals have shaped my views on the arts and human development, teaching, demonstrating, questioning, arguing, and sometimes even agreeing with me during a decade spent in the uniquely stimulating intellectual climate of the Boston area. So extensive is my debt that I am not certain where my own ideas begin and those of others--some close friends, other persons I have never met--leave off. I am grateful to Drs. Jeanne Bamberger, Irvin Child, Eugene Green, Diana Korzenik, John Kennedy, Michael Maratsos, David Perkins, Sheldon White, and especially Kurt Fischer, each of whom read large segments of the manuscript and commented critically on it; and to my wife Judy, who provided a productive blend of criticism, suggestion, and encouragement. I also want to thank Dr. Roger Brown, who encouraged me to undertake and then to complete this work; members of Project Zero and its founder Dr. Nelson Goodman, who listened for hours to many of my ideas when they were yet more inchoate; Eric Valentine and Christine Valentine who offered a great many valuable editorial suggestions; Bill Lohman, who assisted throughout with the preparation of the manuscript; and the various institutions and granting agencies who have generously supported my research and given me time to think. It is a privilege to remember the children, including Kerry and Jay, who have shown me so much more than I have been able to capture in these pages.I also want to thank the following individuals and publishers for permitting me to reprint copyrighted materials:
To Professor Rudolf Arnheim, The University of California Press, and Faber and Faber Limited for permission to reproduce a drawing "Bear Village," from R. Arnheim, Art and Visual Perception.
To Blackie and Sons Ltd. for permission to quote poems from S. Lane and M. Kemp, An Approach to Creative Writing in the Primary School.

-xvii-

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The Arts and Human Development: A Psychological Study of the Artistic Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures, Tables, and Works of Art viii
  • Preface and Overview xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction to the Paperback Edition xxi
  • One - The Relationship of Art to Human Development 1
  • Two - The Three Systems in Animals and Infants 53
  • Three - From Mode to Symbol 88
  • Four - The World of Symbols 125
  • Summary 172
  • Five - Experimental Research on Artistic Development 178
  • Six - Achieving Mastery 242
  • Concluding Remarks 292
  • Seven - The Relationship of the Arts to Science, Illness, and Truth 301
  • Bibliographical Notes 351
  • Author Index 383
  • Subject Index 389
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