U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Laws and Issues: A Documentary History

By Michael Lemay; Elliott Robert Barkan | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Significant Dates in Immigration and Naturalization Law
1700-1740Various colonies pass immigration related "province laws."
1740British Naturalization Law enacted to systematize naturalization
procedures and encourage immigration to the American colonies.
It set a pattern followed by the colonies and later the United States
government after independence.
1789United States Constitution adopted. Article I, Section 8 empowers
the Congress "To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization."
1790Among its first actions, the Congress established a uniform rule
of naturalization, imposing a two-year residency for aliens who
are "free white persons" of good character.
1802Congress revises the Naturalization Act of 1790, specifying a five-
year length of residency and renunciation of allegiance and fidel-
ity to foreign powers.
1813Congress reaffirms the five-year period for naturalization in the
Five-Year Residence Act.
1819Congress passes an act requiring ship masters to deliver a mani-
fest enumerating all aliens transported for immigration and re-
quiring the Secretary of State to annually inform Congress of the
number of immigrants who were admitted.
1848Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo signed guaranteeing U.S. citizen-
ship to Mexicans remaining in the territory ceded by Mexico to
the United States.
1855Castle Garden becomes New York's principal point of entry.
1861-1865Civil War
1862Congress enacts the Homestead Act, granting up to 160 acres of
free land to settlers who develop the land and remain on it for
five years, spurring much immigration.

-xxxix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Laws and Issues: A Documentary History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.