U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Laws and Issues: A Documentary History

By Michael Lemay; Elliott Robert Barkan | Go to book overview

Glossary
Adjustment to Immigrant Status. A procedure whereby a nonimmigrant may apply for a change of status to a lawful permanent resident if an immigrant visa is available for his or her country. The alien is counted as an immigrant as of the date of the adjustment.
Alien. A person who is not a citizen or national of the United States.
Amicus curiae. A "friend of he court" legal brief submitted by a state or an interest group that is not a party to a case but which has an interest in the outcome of the case in which it argues its position on the case.
Amnesty. The granting of legal relief or pardon; in the Immigration Reform and Control Act, granting legal temporary resident status to a previously illegal (undocumented) alien.
Asia-Pacific Triangle. An area encompassing countries and colonies from Afghanistan to Japan and south to Indonesia and the Pacific Islands. Immigration from this area was severely limited to small quotas established in the McCarran-Walter Act ( 1952). The Asia-Pacific Triangle replaced the Asiatic Barred Zone.
Asiatic Barred Zone. Established by the Immigration Act of 1917, it designated a region from which few natives could enter the United States.
Asylee. A person in the United States who is unable or unwilling to return to his or her country of origin because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution. The person is eligible to become a permanent resident after one year of continuous residence in the United States.
Asylum. The granting of temporary legal entrance to an individual who is an asylee.
Border card. A card allowing a person living within a certain zone of the U.S. border to cross back and forth legally for employment purposes without a passport or visa.
Border patrol. The law enforcement arm of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

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