An Extraordinary Silence: The Emergence of a Deeply Disturbed Child

By David C. Cipolloni | Go to book overview

Preface

This is a work of non-fiction.

In order to respect the confidential nature of the subject matter and to protect the privacy of the principal characters, their names have been changed, and any identifying locations, circumstances, and events have been altered.

I have written this with great respect for all the children and families that are presented or referred to here, and for all of the others that I have worked with that are in many ways represented here.

I do not presume, intend, nor wish to rebuke, blame, or judge any of the actual people involved. I do hope to help unravel the gnarled and confusing issues of responsibility and action in dealing with children of difficulty and uniqueness, perhaps to cast another angle of light upon the purposes and effects of categorizing, theorizing about, and perceiving them.

I came to know a deep empathy with each of the children and family members and it is from that knowing, of the sheer and utter pain and helplessness and anger and loneliness of their experience, that I came to write this.

David Cipolloni November 1992 Flagler Beach, Florida

-ix-

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An Extraordinary Silence: The Emergence of a Deeply Disturbed Child
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Title Page vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1- In the Box 1
  • 2- Sean Observed 3
  • 3- Beginning Encounters 7
  • 4- Disrupted Territory 13
  • 5- Responding to Presence 19
  • 6- Approaching Communication 23
  • 7- Personality 29
  • 8- Forcing Issues 35
  • 9- Power Plays And Parents 43
  • 10- The Outing 53
  • 11- Between Man and Wife 61
  • 12- Sean's Mastery 67
  • 13- Beyond the Membrane 77
  • 14- Reign of Tension 83
  • 15- The Sense of Self 91
  • 16- Back Together 99
  • 17- Far from Home 105
  • 18- Cunning, Intellect, And Will 113
  • 19- Accepted 117
  • 20- Moving On 127
  • Epilog 133
  • Postscript 135
  • Further Readings 141
  • Index 143
  • About the Author 147
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