In the Shadow of Liberty: The Chronicle of Ellis Island

By Edward Corsi | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
I BEHOLD AMERICA

THE swelling caravan of immigration reached its record volume in 1907 when the incoming tide brought to America 1,285,349 aliens. I was one of them, a ten year old boy.

My first impressions of the new world will always remain etched in my memory, particularly that hazy October morning when I first saw Ellis Island. The steamer Florida, fourteen days out of Naples, filled to capacity with sixteen hundred natives of Italy, had weathered one of the worst storms in our captain's memory; and glad we were, both children and grown-ups, to leave the open sea and come at last through the Narrows into the Bay.

My mother, my stepfather, my brother Giuseppe, and my two sisters, Liberta and Helvetia, all of us together, happy that we had come through the storm safely, clustered on the foredeck for fear of separation and looked with wonder on this miraculous land of our dreams.

Giuseppe and I held tightly to stepfather's hands, while Liberta and Helvetia clung to mother. Passengers all about us were crowding against the rail. Jabbered conversation, sharp cries, laughs and cheers--a steadily rising din filled the air. Mothers and fathers lifted up the babies so that they too could see, off to the left, the Statue of Liberty.

I looked at that statue with a sense of bewilderment, half doubting its reality. Looming shadowy through the mist, it brought silence

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In the Shadow of Liberty: The Chronicle of Ellis Island
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Author's Note vi
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I I Behold America 3
  • Chapter II The Abruzzi 8
  • Chapter III Exile 11
  • Chapter IV A Career Ends in Glory 17
  • Chapter V The Migration 19
  • Chapter VI Pathways of a Youthful Immigrant 22
  • Chapter VII Life on the East Side 25
  • Chapter VIII A Summons to the White House 30
  • Part II 33
  • Chapter I Before Becoming Guardian of the Gate 35
  • Chapter II Great Sectors of the Caravan 39
  • Chapter III America Closes the Gate 47
  • Chapter IV Ellis Island's Romantic Background 57
  • Chapter V I Return to the Island 62
  • Part III 69
  • Chapter I A Picture of 1907 71
  • Chapter II Depression Turns the Tide 93
  • Chapter III America's Last Long Mile 96
  • Chapter IV Listening to Reminiscences 113
  • Chapter V Racketeers and Human Contraband 129
  • Part IV 149
  • Chapter I Vignettes Out of the Long Ago 151
  • Chapter II Matching Wits with John Chinaman 159
  • Chapter III Those "Bad, Bad Radicals"! 177
  • Chapter IV Royalty and Fakers in the Caravan 201
  • Chapter V Storms of the Present and Past 224
  • Part V 259
  • Chapter I Little Tales of Flood-Tide Days 261
  • Chapter II The Caravan's Most Amazing Character 268
  • Chapter III Who Shall Apologize? 281
  • Chapter IV The New Deal 296
  • Index 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 321

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.