17
War Becomes a Reality

On the afternoon of December 7, North Dakota Senator Gerald P. Nye, one of the most vocal members of America First, was scheduled to speak in the Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Hall in Pittsburgh. The hall was filled to its capacity of 2,500.

Robert Nagy of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette went to cover the speech and took along copies of the wire service stories about the attacks at Pearl Harbor and Manila. He was in for an interesting afternoon because Senator Nye loved to attack President Roosevelt's lend-lease program and the steady buildup of America's arsenal; he did not like to hear anything that might change his mind.

The meeting was scheduled to start at 3 P.M., just about the time the second and final wave of Japanese planes was breaking off the attack and leaving Pearl Harbor for their carriers. Nobody in the auditorium knew of the attack. Nagy found Senator Nye in a tiny room backstage with two other speakers, Irene Castle McLaughlin, widow of Vernon Castle, the famous dancer who was killed in World War I, and the Pittsburgh America First chairman, John B. Gordon.

When Nye read the news reports Nagy handed him, his first comment became one of a dozen or so uttered that day which will probably live forever: "It sounds terribly fishy to me."

Nye did not want to believe what he was reading, and probably felt as though part of the reason for his existence was being taken away from him. He turned to Nagy almost pleadingly: "Can't we have some details? Is it sabotage or is it an open attack?" Then he directed his anger where

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Day the War Began
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.