Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace

By Gilbert W. Fairholm | Go to book overview

Chapter 14
Emerging Spiritual Leadership Technologies

The movement today is from the age of producing to an age of thinking ( Marquardt and Reynolds 1994). Results come more from the heart than from the mind. Tomorrow's organizations will engage the mind and heart (the soul) of workers, indeed, all stakeholders ( Pinchot and Pinchot 1994a). The organization that will replace bureaucracy will grant their employees more of the rights and freedoms we now consider normal for citizens in their relations with the larger society and its institutions. These rights include freedom of speech, freedom of press (and e-mail), the rights of free choice and alliances, and the right to make democratic agreements. It assumes workers are thinking contributors, not just physical extensions of the manager's capacities, ideas, and creativity.

There is a move away from the culture of uniformity and rote work to a civilization of knowledge and customization ( Pinchot and Pinchot 1994). Europe and Japan are ahead of the United States in this effort. They have moved from faith in centralized power to faith in the self- organizing systems of the marketplace and democratic control. The recent experience in Eastern Europe has shown that centrally planned economies don't always work. But neither do all centralized systems. Many free enterprise organizations are characterized by preplanned economies and they don't work either; that is, they are becoming less competitive in the global market. Something more is needed than just decentralization.

A similar transformation is taking place in America and it is beginning in our workplaces. It holds the promise of revolutionizing the workplace,

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