Kansas Women in Literature

By Nettie Garmer Barker | Go to book overview

MARGARET PERKINS.

As a 1914 Christmas offering, Margaret Perkins, a Hutchinson High School teacher, gave us her volume of beautiful poems. "The Love Letters of a Norman Princess" is the love story, in verse, of Hersilie, a ward and relative of William, The Conqueror, and Eric, a kinsman of the unfortunate King Harold.

"I thought once, in a dream, that Love came near
With silken flutter of empurpled wings
That wafted faint, strange fragrance from the things
Abloom where age and season never sear.

The joy of mating birds was in my ear,
And flamed my path with dancing daffo-dils
Whose splendor melted into greening hills
Upseeking, like my spirit, to revere."

* * * * * *

"Before you came, this heart of mine
A fairy garden seemed
With lavender and eglantine;
And lovely lilies gleamed
Above the purple-pansy sod
Where ruthless passion never trod."

* * * * * *

"If Heaven had been pleased to let you be
A keeper of the sheep, a peasant me,
Within a shepherd's cottage thatched with vine
Now might we know the bliss of days divine."

-33-

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Kansas Women in Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Effie Graham. 7
  • Esther M. Clark. 9
  • Mary Vance Humphrey. 11
  • Kate A. Aplington. 13
  • Emma Upton Vaughn. 15
  • Jessie Wright Whitecomb. 16
  • Myra Williams Jarrell. 17
  • Ellen Palmer Allerton. 19
  • Emma Tanner Wood. 21
  • Cornelia M. Stockton. 23
  • Margaret Hill Mccarter. 27
  • Margaret Perkins. 33
  • Anna E. Arnold. 35
  • Index. 42
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