Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War

By Howard Jones | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
"Days of Grace": Emancipation the Prelude to Foreign Intervention?

The character of the war will be changed. It will be one of subjugation. . . . The [old] South is to be destroyed and replaced by new propositions and ideas.

President Abraham Lincoln, September 25, 1862

The Battle of Antietam followed by the announcement of emancipation did not close the door on foreign intervention. Europe's horror at the events rapidly unfolding in America increased with the perception that the bloodiest single day's fighting in the war had ended in a stalemate, guaranteeing prolonged and bitter combat. Civilized peoples, hitherto watching the war and hoping for its quick end, now openly favored an intervention aimed at halting the conflict in the name of humanity. Also important, the certainty of a long war meant that imminent cotton shortages would cause an international economic crisis injuring England, France, and other nations conducting business with the South. Still others in both England and France had imperial interests in mind. The combination of idealistic and realistic interests constituted a powerful force for intervention in the aftermath of Antietam and the Lincoln administration's move toward emancipation.

* * *

Driven by its deep skepticism over Lincoln's purposes in the war, the Palmerston ministry, reacted to emancipation in precisely the negative manner predicted by Russell in his letter to Everett in July 1861. The first British response was widespread indignation, though admittedly tempered by the grudging realization that the president had finally drawn the line between opponents and supporters of slavery. And yet some months would have to pass before the British assessed the new situation in a calm manner and fully grasped the ultimate impact of Lincoln's decision: the emancipation pro

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.