Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War

By Howard Jones | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

The starting place for any research on Lincoln is his published papers, edited by Roy P. Basler et al. and entitled The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, 9 vols. ( New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1953-55), Supplements ( 1973, 1991). Lincoln's ideas receive careful, sympathetic consideration in James M. McPherson , Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1991). Garry Wills examines Lincoln republicanism in Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1992). The British interventionist threat and related issues involving slavery receive special attention in Howard Jones, Union in Peril: The Crisis over British Intervention in the Civil War ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992).

Lincoln's policies toward slavery and the Union have drawn attention, although not enough on their interrelationship. LaWanda Cox offers a close and favorable analysis in Lincoln and Black Freedom: A Study in Presidential Leadership ( Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1981). For a critical view, see Robert W. Johannsen, Lincoln, the South, and Slavery: The Political Dimension ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1991). See also Don E. Fehrenbacher , "Only His Stepchildren: Lincoln and the Negro," Civil War History 20 ( December 1974); George M. Fredrickson, "A Man but Not a Brother: Abraham Lincoln and Racial Equality," Journal of Southern History 41 ( February 1975); and Howard Jones, "To Preserve a Nation: Abraham Lincoln and Franklin D. Roosevelt as Wartime Diplomatists," in War Comes Again: Comparative Vistas on the Civil War and World War II, ed. Gabor S. Boritt ( New York: Oxford University. Press, 1995), 167-95. For the classic account of Lincoln's move against slavery, see John Hope Franklin, The Emancipation Proclamation ( Garden City NY: Doubleday, 1963).

The most useful broad studies of America's relations with Europe during the Civil War are Ephraim D. Adams, Great Britain and the American Civil War, 2 vols. ( New York: Longmans, Green, 1925); Lynn M. Case and Warren F. Spencer , The United States and France: Civil War Diplomacy. ( Philadelphia: University

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.