The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997

By Wes Williams | Go to book overview

5
Is the World Simple or Complex?

John D. Barrow

The view of the Universe created by discoveries in fundamental science has become increasingly influential beyond the halls of science. It provides the basis for many attempts to interpret the significance of the cosmos and the place of humans within it. Whether we like it or not, our scientific picture of the Universe provokes us to make an evaluation of that picture. Until quite recently, that picture was biased by a particular perspective on the workings of Nature, a perspective that was imposed upon us largely by practicalities. In what follows, I take a look at two contrasting views of Nature that have both been much in the news over recent years, as scientists from very different disciplines have trumpeted dramatic developments through the media and in works of popular science. For the outsider, these different messages can be confusing and disjointed. On the one hand, there are the physicists talking of "Theories of Everything" and the rapid convergence of investigations of Nature towards a single, all-encompassing mathematical theory, whereas, on the other hand, we are told of chaos, unpredictability, and bottomless complexity all around us.

These differing messages have each inspired extrapolations into the philosophy of science and other subjects as well, as commentators seek to evaluate what they have to tell us about who we are, why we are, and where we might be going. My aim, here, is one of explanation: to ask whether the Universe is simple or complicated and to show that the question is a subtle one. Its answer takes us on a tour of many important developments in science. Perhaps it will also help us evaluate the significance of these developments--to understand more accurately both their value for science and the forms of value of which science can legitimately speak.

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to the Oxford Amnesty Lectures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction: Nature, Values, And the Future of Science 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Values of Science And The Science of Values 11
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Science with Scruples 42
  • Notes 55
  • 4 - What Shall We Tell The Children? 58
  • Notes 78
  • 5 - Is the World Simple Or Complex? 80
  • 6 - Faith in the Truth 95
  • Notes 108
  • 7 - The Myths We Live By 110
  • Notes 131
  • About the Editor And Contributors 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 142

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.