The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997

By Wes Williams | Go to book overview

About the Editor and Contributors

John D. Barrow is director of the Astronomy Centre at the University of Sussex. He has taught at Oxford and Berkeley and is the author of nine books exploring the broader ramifications of developments in astronomy, physics, and mathematics. These include The Left Hand of Creation, The Anthropic Cosmic Principle, Pi in the Sky, and The Artful Universe. He lectures around the world and has the curious distinction of having lectured at 10 Downing St, Windsor Castle, and the Vatican Palace.

Richard Dawkins is professor of the public understanding of science at Oxford University and professorial fellow of New College, Oxford. Born in Africa and educated at Oxford, he taught at the University of California at Berkeley before returning to a readership in zoology at Oxford. He is the author of the best- selling books The Selfish Gene, The Blind Watchmaker, The Extended Phenotype, River out of Eden, and Climbing Mount Improbable.

Daniel C. Dennett is distinguished arts and sciences professor, professor of philosophy, and director of the Centre for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He studied philosophy at Harvard and Oxford and has been visiting professor at universities throughout the world. He is codirector of the Curricular Software Studio at Tufts and has designed numerous museum exhibits on computers. He has written widely on various aspects of the mind, and his books include Content and Consciousness, Brainstorms, Elbow Room, Consciousness Explained, Darwin's Dangerous Idea, and Kinds of Minds.

Nicholas Humphrey is professor of Psychology at the New School for Social Research, New York. Educated at Cambridge, he discovered "blindsight," first in monkeys, and later he confirmed its existence in humans. Continuing work with the sensory preferences of animals developed his interest in the psychology of aesthetics and human cognitive capacities. His publications include Consciousness Regained: Chapters in the Development of the Mind, A History of the Mind, Soul Searching, and the successful television series The Inner Eye.

Mary Midgley was formerly senior lecturer in philosophy at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. A moral philosopher, she has taken a particular interest in humankind's relation to the other species in the process of evolution. She has also written extensively on scientific doctrine as a religious rhetoric. Her books include Beast and Man; Animals and Why They Matter; Wickedness; Science as Salvation; and Utopias, Dolphins and Computers.

George Monbiot is founder of The Land Is Ours campaign. Involved in direct- action campaigns throughout Britain, he was the 1995 winner of the UN Global

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The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to the Oxford Amnesty Lectures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction: Nature, Values, And the Future of Science 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Values of Science And The Science of Values 11
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Science with Scruples 42
  • Notes 55
  • 4 - What Shall We Tell The Children? 58
  • Notes 78
  • 5 - Is the World Simple Or Complex? 80
  • 6 - Faith in the Truth 95
  • Notes 108
  • 7 - The Myths We Live By 110
  • Notes 131
  • About the Editor And Contributors 133
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