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Divorced, Beheaded, Survived: A Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII

By Karen Lindsey | Go to book overview

WHO WAS WHO IN THE WORLD OF HENRY VIII
Reading Tudor history is fascinating, but dizzying. There are so many events following closely on one another, and so many people involved in them. Compounding the confusion is the fact that most of these people shared the same small handful of names. There are a dozen Anns and Catherines and Janes, Edwards and Henrys and Charleses. To help alleviate the reader's confusion, here is a list of the most important figures encountered in this book.Since it was an era indifferent to standardized spelling, people often spelled their own names in a variety of ways. I have taken advantage of this to try to alleviate some of the problem with the overwhelming number of Catherines, giving the names of each of the three Queen Catherines a different spelling. I have done the same with the two Queen Anns.The symbol Ω indicates that the person was executed during the reign of Henry VIII.
ANNE OF CLEVES ( 1515?-57) -- daughter of the German Duke of Cleves; fourth wife of Henry VIII. Marriage annulled in 1540
ARTHUR, PRINCE OF WALES ( 1486-1502) -- eldest son of Henry VII; heir apparent to the throne of England. Married Catherine of Aragon. His death put his brother Henry in line for the throne
ASKEW, ANNE ( 1521-46) -- the Fair Gospeler; Protestant proselytizer. Ω by burning
BEAUFORT, MARGARET ( 1441-1509) -- mother of Henry VII; grandmother of Henry VIII
BLOUNT, ELIZABETH ( 1500-40) -- Henry VIII's first known mistress; mother of his son Henry Fitzroy, Earl of Richmond. Married Lord Tailboys
BOLEYN, ANN ( 1507?-36) -- second wife of Henry VIII. Ω on charges of adultery and treason
BOLEYN, GEORGE, VISCOUNT ROCHFORD ( 1503?-36) -- brother of Ann Boleyn. Married to Lady Jane Rochford. Ω

-xv-

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