Divorced, Beheaded, Survived: A Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII

By Karen Lindsey | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY
In writing this book, I used four groups of sources. To begin with there are the standard contemporary and near-contemporary sources--documents of Henry's reign, the Spanish and Venetian diplomatic calendars, Roper Life of Sir Thomas More, Foxe Book of Martyrs, etc. Similarly, I have used the standard later works, such as Mattingly Catherine of Aragon and the various biographies of Henry VIII, without which no book on anyone of the period can be written.In addition, I have used two other types of sources that were necessary to shape this particular work. The first is the studies of the lives of women of the era--some written earlier in this century, but most since the 1970s, when the discipline of women's studies carved out a place in scholarly research.Second, I have used the works of writers who do not particularly deal with the sixteenth century but rather interpret, from a feminist perspective, the realities of women's lives, taking as their starting point the understanding that in male- dominated societies, male interpretations of reality in general and women in particular determine any look at women, past or present. Although I have only occasionally mentioned them in the text, they are the foundation of all my interpretations of these women's lives and experiences.Because notes can distract the reader, and because this book focuses on reinterpretation of accepted facts rather than on disputing the facts themselves, I have avoided using notes.
Ashdon Dulcie. Ladies in Waiting. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1976.
Atkinson Clarissa W. The Oldest Vocation: Christian Motherhood in the Middle Ages. Ithaca, N.Y: Cornell University Press, 1991.
Bainton Roland. The Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. Boston: Beacon Press, 1952.
-----. Women of the Reformation in France and England. Boston: Beacon Press, 1973.
Bale John. Select Works. Ed. H. Christmas. London: Christmas Society, 1849.
Beilen Elaine. Redeeming Eve: Women Writers of the English Renaissance. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987.
Belloc Hilaire. Cranmer. London: Cassell, 1931.
Bengis Ingrid. Combat in the Erogenous Zone. New York: Knopf, 1972.
Brewer J. S. The Reign of Henry VIII. London: Murray, 1884.

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