Divorced, Beheaded, Survived: A Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII

By Karen Lindsey | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abell, Thomas, 77, 96, 98, 156
Act for the Advancement of the True Religion, 191
Act of Six Articles, 140
Albany, Duke of, 36, 40
Amalie of Cleves, 140
Anne of Brittany, 31, 32, 34, 54, 63
Anne of Cleves,
accomplishments, 140-141, 145
annulment of marriage, 152-155, 164
apparel, 148
appearance, 137, 140, 142-146, 157
attitude towards Henry VIII, 146
character, 149-151
death, 213
formal meeting with Henry VIII, 148
as Henry VIII's "sister," 156-157, 184-185, 199
journey to England, 141-142
marriage to Henry VIII, 149-150
progress to Greenwich, 146-149
relations with Kathryn Howard, 164-166
relations with royal children, 166
also mentioned, xv, 162, 167, 171, 181, 186, 197, 201-203, 209, 214, 216
Archibald, Earl of Angus, 40, 71
Arthur, Prince of Wales, xv, 12-15, 17-21, 76, 79, 93
Ashley, Kat, 203
Askew, Anne, xv, xix, xxviii, xxix, 190-197, 199
Askew, Edward, 190
Askew, Francis, 190, 192
Askew, Martha, 191
Askew, Sir William, 190
Askew, Thomas, 190
Atkinson, Clarissa, xix
Audley, Thomas, 88, 130
Bale, Bishop, 196
Barnes, Robert, xxix, 131, 152, 153, 156
Barton, Elizabeth, 103
Basset, Elizabeth, 184
Battle of Bosworth Field, 9
Bayment, Lord, 161
Beaufort, John, 3
Beaufort, Margaret, xv, 2-11, 16, 38, 43, 80, 104, 154, 187, 215
Beaujeu, Ann de, 49
Bedingfield, Henry, 211
Bedingfield, Sir Edmund, 109, 110, 113
Bell, Dr. John, 66
Bengis, Ingrid, xx
Blagge, George, 193, 195, 198
Blount, Elizabeth, xv, xxv, 40, 43
Boleyn, Ann,
accomplishments, 49-50
ambitions, 55, 56, 83
appearance, 45, 47-48
birth, 49
character, 51-52, 54, 101-102, 104-107, 118
charitable activities, xxiv, 101
coronation, xxiii, 94-95
education, 49
execution, 129
hatred of Thomas Wolsey, 53, 80-81
and Henry Percy, 52-54, 55, 102-103, 128
as Henry VIII's paramour, 71-90
and Jane Seymour, 108
and ladies-in-waiting, 105-108
as lady-in-waiting, 49-56

-223-

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