Three Early English Metrical Romances: With An Introduction and Glossary

By Robson; John Robson | Go to book overview

EARLY ENGLISH METRICAL ROMANCES.

THE ANTURS OF ARTHER AT THE TARNEWATHELAN.

I.

IN the tyme of Arther thys antur be-tydde,
Be-syde the Tarnewathelan, as the boke tellus;
That he to Karlylle was comun, that conquerour kydde,
Wythe dukys, and with dosiperus, that with the deure dwellus,
For to hunte atte the herd, that lung hase bynne hydde;
Tyl on a day thay hom dyӡt into the depe dellus,
Fellun to tho femalus, in forest was fredde;
Fayre by fermesones, by frythys, and felles,
To the wudde thay weyndun, these wlonkes in wedes;
Bothe the kyng and the qwene,
And other doӡti by-dene;
Syr Gawan, graythist on grene,
Dame Gaynore he ledus.


II

Thenne Syr Gawan the gode, Dame Gaynour he ledus,
Inne a gliderand gyde, that glemit so gay;
That was with rebans reuersut, quo so ryӡt redys,
Arayit aure with rebans, rycheste of ray;
Hur hud of a haa hew, that hut hede hidus,
Of purpure, and palle werke, and perrè to pay;
Wos schrod in a schort cloke, that the rayn shredes,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Three Early English Metrical Romances: With An Introduction and Glossary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Council Of The Camden Society, For the Year 1841-2. v
  • Introduction. vii
  • Description of the Manuscript. xxxvii
  • The Anturs of Arther at the Tarnewathelan. 1
  • Sir Amadace. 27
  • The Avowynge of King Arther, Sir Gawan, Sir Kaye, and Sir Bawdewyn of Bretan. 57
  • Notes. 94
  • Glossary. 111
  • Corrigenda, &c. 131
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 134

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.