The Witch Must Die: The Hidden Meaning of Fairy Tales

By Sheldon Cashdan | Go to book overview

10
Sloth Geppetto's Dream

An old king lay upon his deathbed, and as he had no son to reign after him he sent for his three nephews, and said to them:

"My dear nephews, I feel that my days are drawing to an end, and one of you will have to be king when I am dead. But though I have watched you all closely, I know not which is most fit to wear the crown, so my wish is that you should each try it in turn. The eldest shall be king first, and if he reigns happily, all well and good; if he fails, let the next take his place; and if he fails, let him give it to the one who is left. In this way you will know which is the best fitted to govern."

On this, the three young men all thanked their uncle, each declaring he would do his best. Soon after, the old king died and was buried with great state and ceremony.

-195-

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The Witch Must Die: The Hidden Meaning of Fairy Tales
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Dedication Page v
  • Other Works by Sheldon Cashdan vi
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Once Upon a Time 1
  • 2 - The Witch Within The Sleeping Beauties 21
  • 4 - Where Bread Crumbs Lead 63
  • 5 - Envy If the Slipper Fits . . 85
  • 6 - Objects That Love 107
  • 7 - Deceit Spinning Tales, Weaving Lies 129
  • 8 - Lust A Tail of the Sea 151
  • 9 - Greed The Beanstalk's Bounty 173
  • 10 - Sloth Geppetto's Dream 195
  • 11 - Inside Oz 217
  • 12 - Once Upon a Future 239
  • Appendix 1 - Using Fairy Tales 259
  • Appendix 2 - Finding Fairy Tales 273
  • Index 277
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