The Boxer Rebellion: The Dramatic Story of China's War on Foreigners That Shook the World in the Summer of 1900

By Diana Preston | Go to book overview

17
Tke Faith and Fate of the Missionaries

The horror of it seems too great to realize. -- Luella Miner

BISHOP Favier could, at least, reflect that he had saved his people from the dreadful fate meted out to converts and missionaries in the rural areas during what Luella Miner called the "summer's carnival of crime." News of this was now trickling through. Sarah Conger described how "most heart-rending reports are coming in from different quarters." She recounted the tale of a four-year-old Christian child, Paul Wang, who was stabbed with swords and spears and thrown three times into a fire, but who "manifested such tenacity of life that the leading Boxers bowed to him, and turned him over to the village elders, saying that Buddha was protecting him." A shocked Luella Miner wrote that "the horror of it seems too great to realize." She found it difficult to sleep as her mind resonated with tales of convert children whose heads had been pulled off; people buried alive in coffins; others wrapped in cotton, saturated with oil, and set alight. "One is taken back to the time of Nero," she wrote. Thousands had been murdered. Bishop Favier later estimated the number of Catholic deaths alone at "not less than 30,000."

However, it was the news of the murder of well over two hundred foreign nuns, priests, and missionaries and their families, including many children, that evoked the greatest horror among the

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The Boxer Rebellion: The Dramatic Story of China's War on Foreigners That Shook the World in the Summer of 1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Part I - The Poison in the Well 1
  • 1 - Thousand Deaths 3
  • 2 - Boxer and Devils 22
  • 3 - The Approaching Hour 33
  • 4 - Rats in a Trap 51
  • 5 - Sha! Sha! 66
  • Part II - Death and Destruction to the Foreigner! 87
  • 6 - A Failed Rescue 89
  • 7 - City of Mud and Fire 105
  • 8 - Behind the Tartar Wall 124
  • 9 - The Drifting Horror 146
  • 10 - The Darkest Night 165
  • Part III - War and Watermelons 175
  • 11 - A Truce and a Triumph 177
  • 12 - The Half-Armistice 190
  • 13 - Horsemeat and Hope 213
  • 14 - In Through the Sluice Gate 233
  • Part IV - Murder, Rape, and Exile 251
  • 15 - Tour of Inspection 253
  • 16 - The Osland of the Peitang 262
  • 17 - Tke Faith and Fate of the Missionaries 275
  • 18 - The Spoils of Peking 283
  • Part V - Another Country 297
  • 19 - The Treaty 299
  • 20 - The Court Returns 312
  • 21 - . . and the Foreigner Departs 320
  • 22 - The Boxer Legacy 335
  • Epilogue 353
  • Acknowledgments 361
  • Notes and Sources 363
  • Bibliography 402
  • Art Credits 409
  • Index 410
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