The Boxer Rebellion: The Dramatic Story of China's War on Foreigners That Shook the World in the Summer of 1900

By Diana Preston | Go to book overview

21
. . . And the Foreigner Departs

The starlight shone . . . softening all harsh outlines, hiding all the horrors of destruction, glorifying the . . . sordid surroundings in soft mystery. -- The Reverend Roland Allen

BY the time of Tzu Hsi's death, many of the foreigners who had experienced the strange events of the Boxer Rebellion were long gone. Within weeks of the relief, Sir Claude MacDonald had exchanged places with Sir Ernest Satow in Tokyo. He became the first British ambassador, as opposed to minister, to Japan. A few days before Sir Claude left Peking, Morrison wrote to Moberley Bell of the Times: "I, personally, am very sorry. He acted exceedingly well during the siege and was an example to all the other Ministers, especially to the French Minister who was a craven-hearted cur." Sir Claude died of heart failure in London in 1915.

The Congers left Peking in 1905. Sarah felt deep sympathy for the country she was quitting. She could not condone the excesses of the Boxer rising but she understood the frustration that had led to it, maintaining that China belonged to the Chinese and that the foreigner was "an obnoxious invader" who had forced his way in. She also believed she had established a "genuine friendship" with Tzu Hsi, whose farewell gift to her was the lucky bloodstone she had carried with her during her flight from Peking. Her husband, Edwin, died just two years later. His friend President McKinley had become another victim of the anarchist's bullet in 1901.

-320-

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The Boxer Rebellion: The Dramatic Story of China's War on Foreigners That Shook the World in the Summer of 1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Part I - The Poison in the Well 1
  • 1 - Thousand Deaths 3
  • 2 - Boxer and Devils 22
  • 3 - The Approaching Hour 33
  • 4 - Rats in a Trap 51
  • 5 - Sha! Sha! 66
  • Part II - Death and Destruction to the Foreigner! 87
  • 6 - A Failed Rescue 89
  • 7 - City of Mud and Fire 105
  • 8 - Behind the Tartar Wall 124
  • 9 - The Drifting Horror 146
  • 10 - The Darkest Night 165
  • Part III - War and Watermelons 175
  • 11 - A Truce and a Triumph 177
  • 12 - The Half-Armistice 190
  • 13 - Horsemeat and Hope 213
  • 14 - In Through the Sluice Gate 233
  • Part IV - Murder, Rape, and Exile 251
  • 15 - Tour of Inspection 253
  • 16 - The Osland of the Peitang 262
  • 17 - Tke Faith and Fate of the Missionaries 275
  • 18 - The Spoils of Peking 283
  • Part V - Another Country 297
  • 19 - The Treaty 299
  • 20 - The Court Returns 312
  • 21 - . . and the Foreigner Departs 320
  • 22 - The Boxer Legacy 335
  • Epilogue 353
  • Acknowledgments 361
  • Notes and Sources 363
  • Bibliography 402
  • Art Credits 409
  • Index 410
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