The Experimental Psychology of Beauty

By C. W. Valentine | Go to book overview

Chapter IX SOME REACTIONS TO MODERN ART

Aim and plan of experiments
In order to get impressions about some modern Art among young people who had had no special training in Art, and were not likely to have become fixed in their tastes, I did an experiment with students of my own. These were all training to be professional musicians or teachers of music, and I thought that good because it does imply that they had a genuine enjoyment of some aesthetic experiences. For the experiment I called for volunteers, and the majority of these were women. The students were first asked to state: (a) how many picture galleries they had visited; (b) whether they had had any Art training, other than drawing in black and white at school; (c) whether they were specially interested in pictures.I managed to secure good coloured reproductions of a fair range of pictures, including several not highly "modernistic".I give here a complete list of the pictures shown to the students.
1. Taken from the B.B.C. booklet, Style and Vision, selected by Eric Newton for use in connexion with his talks' Monet -- "Rouen Cathedral", Turner -- "San Benedetto", Van Gogh -- "Landscape near Auvers", Seurat -- "The Bridge of Courbevoie", Matisse -- "The Amber Necklace".
2. Taken from Contemporary Art, by Rosamund Frost (Crown Publishers, New York): Fernand Leger -- "The City", Henri Rousseau -- "The Woman with the Serpent", Eugene Berman -- "A Perfect Sunset", Vastly Kandinsky -- "Improvisation", Piet Mondrian -- "Composition", Kurt Seligmann -- "Sabbath Phantoms".
3. Taken from Van Gogh with an introduction by Philip James (Faber and Faber): "The Café at Night" and "The Ravine".
4. Coloured card reproductions, published by F. Hazan, Paris: P. Klee -- "Image d'hiver", Picasso -- "Nu couché et femme assise à la mandoline", Braque -- "Nature morte", Picasso -- "Naturemorte à la tête antique"

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Experimental Psychology of Beauty
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 440

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.