The Experimental Psychology of Beauty

By C. W. Valentine | Go to book overview

Chapter XIV EXPERIMENTS WITH MODERN POETRY

The revolution in English poetry dominant in the first half of the twentieth century was so great that special treatment is demanded from the psychologist's point of view.

I could find no experiments in this country concerned with the special characteristics of modern poetry, and only very scanty ones conducted in the U.S.A. At first I felt, with some relief, that this exempted me from the necessity of dealing with modern poetry, which I did not feel competent to do, as I had done no experiments with it myself. However, I thought later that I ought to try to do something at least to start such experiments. As I have at present no classes of students suitable for them I had to find collaborators, and here I was fortunate in gaining the help of three: James Britton, Tutor in the teaching of English in the University Institute of Education, London, whose experiments with poetry I have already discussed earlier (p. 348), and who has himself written some poetry;1 A. M. Wilkinson, Tutor in the teaching of English in the Education Department of Birmingham University, who as Peter Gurney has had several verse-plays broadcast in the Third Programme; and Megan Evans, Lecturer in English at Wrexham Training College. I was especially glad to find collaborators who were sympathetically inclined to modern poetry, as I wanted to avoid the influence of any possible prejudice against it in the responses of the students to whom the poems were read and presented by my collaborators.

I realize that my experiments may seem superficial to experts on modern poetry, but Richards goes so far as to say: "The beginning of every research ought to be superficial, and to find something to

____________________
1
Britton has also broadcast talks on poetry including the reading of short poems written by very young children.

-377-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Experimental Psychology of Beauty
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 440

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.