Troja: Results of the Latest Researches and Discoveries on the Site of Homer's Troy, 1882

By Heinrich Schliemann | Go to book overview
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APPENDIX III.
ON VIRCHOW'S "OLD TROJAN TOMBS AND SKULLS."
BY KARL BLIND.

Alt-Trojanische Gräber und Schädel. Von Rudolf Virchow. ( Berlin: Verlag der Kön. Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1882.)

THE reconstruction of Trojan ethnology is full of the greatest importance for a right estimate of Dr. Schliemann's wonderful excavations. From the remains at hand for the solution of this question, the great German physiologist, who has himself been for so many years active in unearthing mute testimonies of the past, both in Europe and Asia Minor, gives with due care and caution a highly interesting description in Old Trojan Tombs and Skulls. Considering the scantiness of the material, he does not strongly commit himself to any fixed theory as to the origin and kinship of the people who once dwelt on the hill of Hissarlik and its neighbourhood. But more than once he points to the possibility of a Thrakian connection; and here, I believe, the ultimate solution will be found.

For my own part, I have for some time past brought forward this hypothesis as a strong conviction, forced upon me by a comparison of all the passages in classic authors, which bear upon the Trojan, Thrakian, Getic, and Gothic tribes.

Professor Virchow's procedure is, it need not be said, based upon craniology. He tries to solve obscure race-questions from the outer structure of man, so far as this can be done with any degree of certainty. Frequent enquiries have, however, taught him, that points of extraordinary contact are often to be found among populations apparently the most widely divergent, so much so, that doubt now and then arises even as to the Aryan, Semitic--nay, Hamitic -- character of a special skull whose origin is not known. In order to justify the extreme reserve

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