The Private Franklin: The Man and His Family

By Claude-Anne Lopez ; Eugenia W. Herbert | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

WE ARE OFTEN asked how a joint authorship works. It works the way a marriage does, quite differently from the original plan. We had decided at first that C.L. would draw from the primary sources while E.H. would do the outside reading and provide the historical context. As it turned out, everybody did everything amid a collective juggling of two husbands, two daughters, three sons, one dog, two cats, and two goats, all of whom are thanked here for their patience, cooperation, and for the insights they provided into family life.

Most of the research was carried out at Yale and we express our gratitude to the entire staff of the Franklin Collection. William Willcox, editor of The Papers of Benjamin Franklin, read portions of the manuscript and allowed us to roam and rummage. G. B. Warden, assistant editor of the Papers, went over the pre-Revolutionary chapters and shared with us his special knowledge of Boston and Massachusetts. Dorothy Bridgwater and Mary L. Hart, who between them can locate almost any piece of information, were generous with their time and skills.

At the American Philosophical Society, Whitfield J. Bell was as always a helpful and encouraging friend. We also wish to acknowledge the assistance of the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.

C.L. is grateful to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for a fellowship grant to work on this book. At an earlier date, as a guest of the Rockefeller Foundation, she spent one month in the stimulating atmosphere of Villa Serbelloni in Bellagio. E.H. expresses her thanks to Susan Achenbach and Alice Miskimin for support of a very different kind, and C.L. to Naomi Gordon, Dorothee Finkelstein, Mary Kleiner, and Florence Stankiewicz.

-xiii-

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The Private Franklin: The Man and His Family
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • A Subjective Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Prologue: the Sweet Air of Twyford 1
  • I - Son and Sibling 5
  • II - Errata Committed, Errata Corrected 16
  • III - Industry, Frugality, Fertility 30
  • IV - Out of the Home and into the World 42
  • V - "Much of a Beau" 59
  • VI - "The Seeds of Every Female Virtue" 70
  • VII - London 78
  • VIII - Homecoming, Homesickness 93
  • IX - Faith or Deeds? 104
  • X - The Dream and the Nightmare 116
  • XI - Father of the Bride 135
  • XII - The Patriarch of Craven Street 149
  • XIII - "Sorrows Roll Upon Me like The, Waves of the Sea" 158
  • XIV - "Your a Feck Shonet Wife" 166
  • XV - Steering Through Storms 176
  • XVI - "You Are a Thorough Courtier" 190
  • XVII - Tug of War 200
  • XVIII - No Watch for Benny, No Feathers for Sally 218
  • XIX - "Temple, is My Right Hand" 236
  • XX - "Nothing Has Ever Hurt Me So Much" 253
  • XXI - Indian Summer 266
  • XXII - From Seine to Schuylkill 281
  • XXIII - Slaves 296
  • XXIV - "Our Little Fleet of Barques" 308
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index 351
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