The Private Franklin: The Man and His Family

By Claude-Anne Lopez ; Eugenia W. Herbert | Go to book overview

XV
Steering through Storms

I for the most part kept my sentiments to myself and only endeavoured to steer my little bark quietly through all the storms of political contest with which I was every where surrounded.
--William Franklin to William Strahan, June 18, 1771

IN AN OUTBURST of filial gratitude, William Franklin had once assured his father that he was prepared to follow him to the ends of the earth. But he was not, as it turned out, prepared to follow him along the ideological path to independence. In 1775, William was an officer of the crown every bit as much as he had been when he had "kissed hands" in 1762. While Benjamin Franklin tacked and trimmed his way through the decade between the repeal of the Stamp Act and the Declaration of Independence, his son attempted to carry out the instructions of His Majesty's government even when he detested its ministers and deplored its policies. However much one may fault him for lack of imagination, for failing to see that the world was changing, one cannot accuse him of a breach of faith or a lack of consistency.

For over twelve years--far longer than any of his fellow governors-- William administered New Jersey as successfully as a man of good will, considerable industry, and adequate intelligence could be expected to do in difficult circumstances. Were it not for the Revolution, he might be remembered chiefly for his efforts to improve roads in his province and alleviate the condition of debtors in its prisons. The twin capitals of his little domain were the sleepy river ports of Burlington and Perth Amboy, on opposite sides of the colony. The early Proprietors of East Jersey had fixed on Ambo Point as "a sweet, wholesome and delightful place, proper for trade,"1 and the same description could have served for Burlington, the capital of West Jersey. Neither fulfilled the commercial expectations of its Quaker settlers, though Burlington had a brief heyday as a shipbuilding and trade center between the Delaware and the West Indies before being eclipsed by Philadelphia, eighteen

-176-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Private Franklin: The Man and His Family
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 366

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.