Art for Art's Sake & Literary Life: How Politics and Markets Helped Shape the Ideology & Culture of Aestheticism, 1790-1990

By Gene H. Bell-Villada | Go to book overview

ACKNO + ̣ + ̣WLEDGMENTS

To the National Endowment for the Humanities, for a 1979 grant that made possible much of the basic research for this study, and also defrayed transportation costs for access to scholarly sources in Mexico and France.

To Julia Prewitt Brown, Sara Castro-Klarén, Chinweizu, Ronald Christ, Linda Danielson, Tom Engelhardt, Antonio Giménez, Paul Holdengräber, Robert Jackall, Katherine Singer Kovács (in memoriam 1946-89), Ilse Hempel Lifschutz, George Pistorius, Arturo Ramos, Eugenio Suárez Galbán, Jasminka Udovicki, Patricia Wilcox, Susan Woodward, and an anonymous reader for the University of Nebraska Press, whose observations and encouragement at various points in the development of this project made me feel that it was worth pursuing.

To Françoise Pérus in Mexico City, whose ideas, interest, and hospitality helped confirm for me the potential value of the direction of my researches.

To Erica Harth and Michael McKeon, of the Division on Sociological Approaches to Literature ( Modern Language Association), to George Katsiaficas of the Wentworth Institute of Technology, and to the Williams College Faculty Lecture Series, for granting me the opportunity to air some of these ideas in public.

To Robert J. Temple, M.D., from whom I first learned, as an undergraduate, about T. S. Eliot's social and political views and their importance to his poetic oeuvre.

To Trudi Abel, Kerry Batchelder, Kanani Bell, Charles Hatten, Tamar Heller, Robert Jackall, Steven Kovács, Jorge Pedraza, and Sandi Clark Watson, for passing on to me various sorts of helpful information relevant to this work.

To Annette Rubinstein and the editors of Science & Society, for accepting and publishing, in 1987, parts of this work in essay form.

To Williams College, for a generous policy on leaves, which allowed for two different sabbaticals with much free time to read and write, and also for the periodic support made available via the College's Division I research-funding program.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Art for Art's Sake & Literary Life: How Politics and Markets Helped Shape the Ideology & Culture of Aestheticism, 1790-1990
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.