Understanding the Great Gatsby: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

By Dalton Gross; MaryJean Gross | Go to book overview
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Alexander was sent in to pitch when informed that that game was to be fixed, was admitted. He also was asked concerning the replacing of Merkle by Barber and the playing of Herzog, whose error in the game was costly.

That in all probability no indictments will result from the investigation was admitted by the authorities. If they can purge the game of any taint of scandal they will have accomplished a great deal, they say. Judge McDonald, who ordered the investigation, declared it was solely for the good of the sport.


FROM "PLAN PROBE OF COHAN-TENNES LOSSES ON SOX" (Chicago Tribune, September 24, 1920)

Dropped $110,000 on Series, Report

George M. Cohan, the actor, and Mont Tennes, the Chicago gambler, both of whom were heavy losers in games in the last world's series, which it is charged was "fixed," are expected to be asked by the Cook county grand jury to tell what they know of the efforts of gamblers to corrupt professional baseball.

An inside story that Mr. Cohan informed friends of a loss of $30,000 on games which his own investigations have since indicated were "thrown" will be placed before the grand jury.

Reports fix the amount that Tennes lost on the last world's series at $80,000.


"Series Crooked"--Hoyne

In New York State's Attorney Hoyne said the statement that Cohan and Tennes had information regarding baseball crookedness would be thoroughly investigated by his office and that "if the inquiry warrants it their presence will be sought.

"Judging from a preliminary investigation," Mr. Hoyne added, "I have no doubt the 1919 world's series was crooked and that at least one Chicago player was crooked.

" JudgeMcDonald, the judicial head of the grand jury's investigation, is 100 per cent square, and the public may be assured everything will be done to get to the bottom of the thing that justice may be done to baseball and gambling be eradicated."


Jury Foreman "Shocked"

Henry H. Brigham, foreman of the grand jury, made a similar statement at the close of the day's investigations.

-63-

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