The Desert Fox in Normandy: Rommel's Defense of Fortress Europe

By Samuel W. Mitcham Jr. | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

When I visited the United Kingdom and the European mainland in the summer of 1994, I was encouraged by several friends to write the story of the Normandy invasion from the German point of view. It certainly was not hard to convince me to do so, because I had done a book of a similar nature. (Twelve or more years ago I wrote a book entitled Rommel's Last Battle, but much has been written and uncovered since then.) This project quickly developed into one focusing on the generalship of Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, the Desert Fox, and the last 10 months of his incredible life.

To understand history, one must read biography--especially the biographies of famous leaders. This goes against the current fad in many American universities--where it is considered unfashionable or "politically incorrect" to study or write about "DWMs" (dead white males), a term usually muttered by leftist and largely socialist professors with a slight air of contempt, condescension, and perceived (and self-ordained) intellectual self-superiority. Unfortunately, these people write as they think, which is why so much garbage and so little of substance or importance is being produced by the vast majority of them. Like it or not, we owe our Western Civilization, our democratic and religious institutions, our values, and most things that make life worth living, to DWMs--not to affirmative action and similar scams.

DWMs have also produced a great deal of havoc and mischief. The worst one to appear in our century (with the possible exception of Stalin) was Adolf Hitler. Democratically elected (he garnered the same percentage of the popular vote as did Bill Clinton in 1992 and Abraham Lincoln in 1860), he quickly established himself as the master of Germany while simultaneously increasing his popularity and expanding German space--initially by peaceful means. When these methods failed and he

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The Desert Fox in Normandy: Rommel's Defense of Fortress Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Atlantic Wall 1
  • Chapter 2 - D-Day 57
  • Chapter 3 - Holding Fast 93
  • Chapter 4 - Cherbourg 129
  • Chapter 5 - The Crumbling Fortress 141
  • Chapter 6 - A pitiless Destiny 179
  • Appendix I - Table of Equivalent Ranks 203
  • Appendix II - German Staff Abbreviations 205
  • Appendix III - Characteristics of Opposing Tanks 207
  • Appendix IV - Rommel's Schedule, March 23-June 4, 1944 209
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
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