The Feminist Encyclopedia of French Literature

By Eva Martin Sartori; Colette H. Winn et al. | Go to book overview

L
La Briche, Adélaïde-Edmée Prévost de ( 1755-1844). The only child of a doting mother, La Briche was well educated, became an accomplished musician, learned Italian, and studied mathematics. In marrying the younger brother of M. d'Epinay and Mme d'Houdetot, she entered the world of financiers. From an uncle she inherited a great fortune and the chateau du Marais near Paris. Widowed young, she never remarried, devoting her life to her daughter, extended family, and friends. During half a century, and regardless of the politics of the day, her salon* attracted men and women of letters, artists, members of government, financiers, and aristocrats, such as Saint-Lambert, Morellet, Marmontel, La Harpe, Fontanes, Chateaubriand, Pauline de Beaumont, Sophie Cottin*, Mme de Genlis*, Guizot, the Duke of Wellington, Talleyrand, and Walter Scott. She wrote--but did not publish--memoirs* and journals of her travels to Italy, Switzerland, England, and Scotland. Although she lived in turbulent times, she was never in danger, and continued to welcome relatives and friends in both her summer and winter houses and to give help and shelter to the needy. Loved and admired, she was universally known for her kindness. Catherine Lafarge
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Secondary Texts
Zurich, Pierre de. Une Femme heureuse, Madame de la Briche. Paris: E. de Boccard, 1934.
-----. Les Voyages en Suisse de Madame de la Briche. Neuchdtel and Paris: Victor Attinger, 1934.

La Fite, Marie Elisabeth Bouée de ( 1750?-1794). The wife of a Protestant preacher living in La Haye, as a mother La Fite found that there were few books suitable for young children. In her Entretiens, drames et contes moraux ( 1778),

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The Feminist Encyclopedia of French Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Note x
  • A Feminist History of French Literature xi
  • Bibliography xv
  • Bibliography xx
  • Bibliography xxiii
  • Bibliography xxvi
  • Bibliography xxx
  • Bibliography xxxv
  • A 3
  • B 34
  • C 72
  • D 137
  • E 171
  • F 195
  • G 223
  • H 250
  • I 266
  • J 275
  • K 280
  • L 287
  • M 333
  • O 400
  • P 404
  • Q 447
  • R 451
  • S 483
  • T 524
  • V 542
  • W 554
  • Y 563
  • Appendix A: General Bibliography 567
  • Appendix B: Chronology of French Women Writers 573
  • Index 585
  • Contributors 631
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