An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification

By Geoffrey Dowding | Go to book overview

Roman
OLD FACE

No new type face approaching that of Jenson appeared until almost the close of the century. In 1495 Aldus Manutius, a scholar interested in the editing of greek texts set up a press in Venice, and issued in that year a tract by the Renaissance humanist Pietro Bembo printed in a variation of the roman letter, which was in a comparatively short time to supersede Jenson's. In this type we have, says Mr Stanley Morison 'the origin of all old-faces'1 though he remarks that it represents only a 'first-state'. It is marred, among other things by over-large capitals and by poor cutting. But in its final and perfected form it is a face of great beauty: the capitals are smaller and both these and the lower-case are lighter. The cutting is greatly improved. Our illustration on page 33 is from the beautiful Aldine book in which it was first used, the famous Hypnerotomachia Poliphili by Francesco Colonna published by Aldus in 1499. A year later, Aldus, who has been named as the greatest of all the Venetian printer-publishers, designed, with the help of his typecutter, the first italic type face. We shall return to this famous type shortly under the section on italics.

Aldus's fame rests in part on his scholarship: his texts were correct and his books were widely distributed throughout Europe. Not only were his texts copied in all the important printing centres but the types in which they were set were copied also.Thus French printers were soon employing their variations of the Aldine roman. One of the first and most famous typecutters to use Aldus's letter as a model was the

____________________
1
In Type Designs of the Past and Present. The Fleuron Ltd. London 1926.

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Contents xv
  • List of Illustrations xvii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Part One the Book Types I 3
  • Gothic 5
  • Roman Venetian 19
  • Roman Old Face 31
  • The Italics 43
  • The Intermediate1 or Transitional Romans 59
  • The Modern-Face Romans 75
  • The Modernized Italics 87
  • Old Style 97
  • Twentieth- Century Types 101
  • Part Two the Display Types 109
  • II 109
  • Latin or Renaissance Scripts 127
  • Decorated 145
  • Shaded 155
  • Fat Face 161
  • Antique or Egyptian 169
  • Shadowed or Three-Dimensional1 175
  • Sans Serif 179
  • Reversed or Cameo 183
  • Ionic 187
  • Outline or Open 191
  • Clarendon 195
  • Calligraphic 199
  • Stencil 203
  • Typewriter 205
  • Miscellaneous Display Types 207
  • Notes on the Illustrations 209
  • Appendix I 264
  • Appendix II Serifs 267
  • Bibliography 269
  • Index 273
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.