An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification

By Geoffrey Dowding | Go to book overview

SHADED

We have already noted that Fournier, pioneer in cutting decorated letters in typography, produced the first shaded types also and showed several sizes in his Manuel of 1764- 1766.

Later, when advertising faces were cut these were equipped with shaded versions but 'the earlier shaded letters fell out of use as decorative material for bookwork'1 and seem rarely to have been used for the next hundred years.

The simplest form of shaded type is one in which a single white line runs down either the left or the right (but more usually the left) of the thick strokes. Types of this kind are still called hand-tooled, the term originating perhaps in the compositor's efforts to tool white lines on display types, i.e. on actual metal sorts. The best of these shaded types may be used with distinction in bookwork and, of course, in many kinds of ephemeral printing. But there are others, designed for use in jobbing printing in which the shading is (a) on the left and on the right of the same stem (b) formed by three or more white lines running parallel with the sides of the thick strokes and (c) formed by horizontal white lines.

There is yet another form of shaded type probably owing its birth to the shaded letters of the early nineteenth century which in the past has been grouped under the name Inline. Present day examples vary in their basic design, some being normally seriffed romans and italics and others sans serifs. All have one thing in common--a white line (often a fine

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1
A. F. Johnson. A GUIDE TO PRESENT-DAY TYPES. Paper and Print. Summer 1933.

-155-

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An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Contents xv
  • List of Illustrations xvii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Part One the Book Types I 3
  • Gothic 5
  • Roman Venetian 19
  • Roman Old Face 31
  • The Italics 43
  • The Intermediate1 or Transitional Romans 59
  • The Modern-Face Romans 75
  • The Modernized Italics 87
  • Old Style 97
  • Twentieth- Century Types 101
  • Part Two the Display Types 109
  • II 109
  • Latin or Renaissance Scripts 127
  • Decorated 145
  • Shaded 155
  • Fat Face 161
  • Antique or Egyptian 169
  • Shadowed or Three-Dimensional1 175
  • Sans Serif 179
  • Reversed or Cameo 183
  • Ionic 187
  • Outline or Open 191
  • Clarendon 195
  • Calligraphic 199
  • Stencil 203
  • Typewriter 205
  • Miscellaneous Display Types 207
  • Notes on the Illustrations 209
  • Appendix I 264
  • Appendix II Serifs 267
  • Bibliography 269
  • Index 273
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