An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification

By Geoffrey Dowding | Go to book overview
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Typewriter

Type forms based on the alphabets employed on standard typewriters would appear to date from sometime after 1878 when the first shift- key typewriter appeared on the American market. A very early italic Schreibmaschinenschrift is that of the Schriftgiess foundry: it appeared in 1897.Versions of the more normal roman have been cut in this country and in Germany, for example the Ribbon Face of Stevens Shanks the face of which is pitted with white to simulate the effect of actual typing on certain papers. Monotype Series 301 is an underlined face.

It is a well-known fact that all the characters on a given (normal) typewriter, i.e. both upper- and lower-case occupy the same space setwise. The types in this group are based on such characters, & besides having short descenders, a large x-height and open counters (if we except the m and w), have a further characteristic in common with contemporary Ionics: they are monoline faces.

Most typefounders have typewriter faces in their range, the normal sizes being 8, 10 and 12 point. The American Bulletin face is cut in sizes up to 36 point. The weights of typewriter faces vary from light, through normal weights, to darker versions.


Some contemporary typewriter faces

Bulletin (American Type Founders), Remington (Linotype), Ribbon Face ( Stevens Shanks ),Typewriter (Monotype) No 1, 2, 3 (each of these includes an underlined version), 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and Monotype IBM 'Executive'.

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An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification
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