An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification

By Geoffrey Dowding | Go to book overview

APPENDIX I

Stress or Shading

In typography letters based on the circle or part circle are usually described as having either oblique or vertical stress, or shading.


OBLIQUE STRESS

If we borrow from the terminology of the compass, letters with oblique stress may be described as having the thickest parts of the strokes at points approximately North-East and South-West. The 60 point Bembo characters shown below will make this point dear and figure (b) on page 200 shows how such round forms are made with a broad-nibbed pen.

We use the term approximately because the position of the thickest parts of the strokes in these round letters with oblique stress will vary not only from type to type but may do so within the range of a single lower-case alphabet. For instance, while the lower-case e may conform perfectly to our description of a letter with oblique stress and therefore NE/SW shading, the o from the same alphabet may be very nearly vertical in stress. To illustrate this we print below examples of the original 60 point Caslon Old Face (Founders).

Again while certain lower-case characters conform to the definition of letters having oblique stress or shading the capitals of the same fount may be letters having an almost vertical stress.


VERTICAL STRESS

Letters with vertical stress or shading have the thickest parts of the strokes due East & West. The letters shown below are set in 60 point Bodoni (Monotype

-264-

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An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Contents xv
  • List of Illustrations xvii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Part One the Book Types I 3
  • Gothic 5
  • Roman Venetian 19
  • Roman Old Face 31
  • The Italics 43
  • The Intermediate1 or Transitional Romans 59
  • The Modern-Face Romans 75
  • The Modernized Italics 87
  • Old Style 97
  • Twentieth- Century Types 101
  • Part Two the Display Types 109
  • II 109
  • Latin or Renaissance Scripts 127
  • Decorated 145
  • Shaded 155
  • Fat Face 161
  • Antique or Egyptian 169
  • Shadowed or Three-Dimensional1 175
  • Sans Serif 179
  • Reversed or Cameo 183
  • Ionic 187
  • Outline or Open 191
  • Clarendon 195
  • Calligraphic 199
  • Stencil 203
  • Typewriter 205
  • Miscellaneous Display Types 207
  • Notes on the Illustrations 209
  • Appendix I 264
  • Appendix II Serifs 267
  • Bibliography 269
  • Index 273
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